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    LaGuardia in the Times

    Highlights of LaGuardia Community College coverage in The New York Times.


  •  Documentary about Gentrification (Housing) Segregation, Featuring LaGuardia Theater Students, to be showcased at 2017 Queens World Film Festival on Friday, March 17, 2017
    Documentary about Gentrification/Housing Segregation, Featuring LaGuardia Theater Students, to be showcased at 2017 Queens World Film Festival on Friday, March 17, 2017

    Documentary about Gentrification/Housing Segregation


    Long Island City, NY (March 16, 2017)—“Raisin/Rosedale,”
    a unique documentary film produced by LaGuardia Community College exploring the history of racial issues throughout the U.S., has been selected for the 2017 Queens World Film Festival, where it will be shown this Friday, March 17th at 6:30 p.m.

     

    The film elegantly weaves together a historical account of housing segregation in Rosedale, Queens, with a fictional portrayal of a black family trying to integrate into a predominantly white Chicago suburb in scenes from A Raisin in the Sun, and interviews with LaGuardia theater students about their first-hand experiences with gentrification.

     

    LaGuardia Community College serves an incredibly diverse and overwhelmingly low-income, disadvantaged student population (more than 70% have family incomes of less than $25,000/yr.).

     

    The 21-minute film brings together some of LaGuardia’s distinctive offerings— the LaGuardia and Wagner Archives, a repository of collections that illuminate the social and political history of New York City, with LaGuardia’s award-winning theater program (whose students regularly best those from prestigious four-year colleges in national theater festivals), and the incredible diversity of the college's student population--making it one of the most diverse institutions of higher learning in the US.

     

    The film is designed to spark dialogue about the history and current state of race relations throughout the U.S., and the effect of gentrification on our cities and neighbors—topics that are particularly timely considering today’s political climate.

     

    WHAT:  Screening of “Raisin/Rosedale” film, produced by LaGuardia Community College, at the 2017 Queens World Film Festival

     

    Interviewsavailable, either before or after the festival, with:

    • Richard K. Lieberman, PhD, Professor of History and Director of the LaGuardia and Wagner Archives
    • Stefanie Sertich, Theatre Program Director, LaGuardia Community College
    • Sandy Chase, director of Raisin/Rosedale
    • LaGuardia Theater Students featured in the Raisin/Rosedale documentary:  Cheyenne Winley, Helena Koudou, John Cosentino, and Jehan Have

     

    WHEN:  6:30 p.m., Friday, March 17th

     

    WHERE:  Kaufman Astoria Studios, Zukor Room, 34-12 36th St., Astoria, NY 11106

     

    TICKETS:  $15/each. Click here to purchase.

    FREE ADMISSION available for media with valid press credentials. For press registration, click here.

     

    More info:  https://www.queensworldfilmfestival.com/films/detail.asp?fid=850


    • • • •

     

    About the LaGuardia Theater Program
    Under the direction of Stefanie Sertich since 2011, LaGuardia theater students have received numerous regional and national recognition through the Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival, which is regarded as the premiere theater program for the more than 600 two- and four-year colleges and universities nationwide with theater programs. LaGuardia students compete in Region I, one of eight regional competitions of the Festival. Regional winners then go to the national festival, held each spring at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C.

     

    Recent LaGuardia awards and honors from the Kennedy Center American College Theatre Festival include:

     

    • In 2017, LaGuardia’s production of Passing Strange received five awards at nationals:


    o Distinguished Production of a Musical
    o Distinguished Director of a Musical
    o Distinguished Ensemble of a Musical
    o Distinguished Performance by an Actress in a Musical—Aliayh Murchison
    o Distinguished Performance by an Actor in a Musical—Jehan Havé

    • In both 2017 and 2016, LaGuardia students were selected as Region I winners of the Kennedy Center American College Theatre Festival’s award in Arts Administration. In 2017, it went to Jose Reyes; in 2016, it went to Viguens Louis.

    • Also in 2016, a LaGuardia theatre graduate studying at Lehman College, Fe Torres, won two prestigious scholarships at nationals: the Dell’Arte International School of Physical Theatre Scholarship, and an Artist-As-Citizen Conference Scholarship.

    • In 2015, Bengal Tiger at the Baghdad Zoo, directed by Stefanie Sertich, was one of four productions showcased at Region I. LaGuardia student Ahsan Ali was honored at nationals as a distinguished actor in a supporting role, for his performance in this production.

    • Also in 2015, LaGuardia student Julio Trinidad took home three awards at nationals that came with sizable scholarships: 2nd place overall, the Mark Twain Comedy Award, and the Margolis Method Acting Training Scholarship.

     

    “While our students have taken home many regional and national theater awards, the true measure of a theater program is its ability to build empathetic citizens in an ever changing world. This reflects our college’s mission as well,” says Sertich.

     

    Some LaGuardia theater graduates are now working actors and others are continuing to hone their craft in well-regarded theater programs at four-year schools. One such graduate who is now a working actor is Ashley August, the 2013 NYC Youth Poet Laureate. For more: http://www.ashleyaugust.com/base/.

     

    About the LaGuardia and Wagner Archivesat LaGuardia Community College
    The LaGuardia and Wagner Archives, established in 1982, serves as a repository for NYC’s social and political history, which includes the largest collection of New York City mayoral papers. Archive records include the personal papers and official documents of Mayors Fiorello H. LaGuardia, Robert F. Wagner, Abraham D. Beame and Edward I. Koch, the records of the New York City Housing Authority, the piano maker Steinway & Sons, The Council of the City of New York and a Queens Local History Collection. Assets from these collections are regularly referenced in news stories, and studied by journalists, policy makers, and other researchers examining the history of Greater New York. The Archives regularly produces public programs exploring its collections, including an annual calendar produced in partnership with The New York Times and the City University of New York.


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     Student Support Programs & Services, e.g., LaGuardia’s ASAP, Improve Student Retention & Graduation
    Student Support Programs & Services, e.g., LaGuardia’s ASAP, Improve Student Retention & Graduation

    Student Support Programs & Services


    Long Island City, NY (March 2017)—In two articles published in The Chronicle of Higher Education, reporter Katherine Mangan takes a close look at the impact of student support programs and services on student retention, success and achievements.


    The City University of New York’s Accelerated Study in Associate Program (ASAP) is one of the nation’s most successful examples of intensive student support programs, and has been shown to increase the number of students graduating within three years.


    LaGuardia Community College is one of nine CUNY campuses that offers ASAP to some 15,000 students.


    Ms. Mangan articles put a spotlight on LaGuardia’s ASAP program and the incredible work it does with students every day, under the leadership of LaGuardia’s Vice President of Student Affairs, Michael Baston.


    Read the articles here:
    Building Remedial Ed’s Support Structure
    How CUNY Community Colleges Make Intensive Student Support Work


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     Gail Mellow, President Of LaGuardia Community College, Wins 2017 TIAA Institute Hesburgh Award
    Dr. Gail O. Mellow, President Of LaGuardia Community College, Wins 2017 TIAA Institute Hesburgh Award
    Presented at American Council on Education’s 99th Annual Meeting

    Gail Mellow, President Of LaGuardia Community College, Wins 2017 TIAA Institute Hesburgh Award
    LaGuardia Community College President Dr. Gail O. Mellow with Lynn Gangone, Vice President, American Council on Education; Molly Corbett Broad, President, American Council on Education; Doug Chittenden, President, TIAA Institute


    WASHINGTON (March 13, 2017)—The TIAA Institute today announced Gail O. Mellow, president of LaGuardia Community College, as the winner of the 2017 TIAA Institute Hesburgh Award for Leadership Excellence, one of the most prestigious awards in academia. Named in honor of Reverend Theodore M. Hesburgh, C.S.C. (1917-2015), former president of the University of Notre Dame and a world-renowned educator and humanitarian, the award recognizes outstanding leadership on the part of a college or university president or chancellor.“Gail Mellow is a true believer in the power of community colleges to change our world for the better. She has built a strong, unified college that places teaching and learning at its core, preparing one of our nation’s most diverse student bodies to successfully navigate a fast-changing society and an uncertain future,” said Stephanie Bell-Rose, TIAA Senior Managing Director and Head of the TIAA Institute.


    The American Council on Education (ACE), which administers the award on the Institute’s behalf, convened an independent panel of judges that selected the winner. The TIAA Institute bestowed this honor today at ACE2017 in Washington, DC, ACE’s 99th Annual Meeting, which is attended by nearly 2,000 higher education leaders, from deans to presidents, representing all types of post-secondary institutions nationwide.


    During President Mellow’s 16-year tenure at LaGuardia Community College, she has tripled the school’s enrollment and doubled full-time faculty. Today LaGuardia serves more than 50,000 degree-seeking and continuing education New Yorkers each year, and has one of the nation’s highest graduation rates among urban community colleges that serve low-income students.


    “I’m honored to receive this award in front of fellow educators at the American Council on Education’s annual meeting,” said President Mellow. “I greatly admire Reverend Hesburgh’s legacy as a champion of social justice, and I’m grateful to the TIAA Institute for bestowing on me this award named in his honor. And in recognition of the associations he forged with leaders from a variety of industries to benefit the university he led and their students, I will continue our work developing pathways for our students to rewarding careers through education-to-employment partnerships with community groups and local businesses.”


    President Mellow, a community college graduate herself, has focused on helping people get out of poverty and into a life of economic stability for them and their families through education. She led a restructuring of LaGuardia’s programs and services, increasing graduation rates and offering holistic academic, career, and transfer advising, as well as extensive support services to help students address financial issues that arise before they lead them to dropping out. Innovative programs at LaGuardia have helped students bridge the gap between completing high school and succeeding in college.


    “ACE is proud to join the TIAA Institute in honoring leaders like Gail Mellow who have confronted head on some of the most challenging issues facing American higher education today,” said ACE President Molly Corbett Broad. “President Mellow’s tireless efforts to expand access to postsecondary education and ensure that her students have the tools they need to succeed have immeasurably strengthened both her institution and the entire higher education community.”


    The TIAA Institute provides a $20,000 grant to Hesburgh awardees, which President Mellow has decided to contribute in full to the LaGuardia Community College Foundation, which gives out nearly $1.8M annually in scholarships and emergency financial support to the College’s primarily low-income and new-immigrant students. More than 70 percent of LaGuardia students have family incomes that are less than $25,000 a year.


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     College Presidents Confident that Higher Education Provides Opportunity and Healing in a Divided Nation
    College Presidents Confident that Higher Education Provides Opportunity and Healing in a Divided Nation

    College Presidents Confident that Higher Education Provides Opportunity and Healing in a Divided Nation


    Long Island City, NY (March 9, 2017)—In an op-ed for the Baltimore Sun, LaGuardia Community College President Gail O. Mellow and the President of Montgomery College DeRionne P. Pollard evaluated the vital role of community colleges and other institutions of higher education as places of dialogue, healing, economic growth, and recovery in a divided nation.


    Read the full article: Community Colleges Can Heal a Divided America


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     SAVE-EMT Program Has to Close its Doors but Free U.S. Citizenship Classes
    LaGuardia Community College SAVE-EMT Program Has to Close its Doors but Free U.S. Citizenship Classes and Legal Services Program Became Available for the Community

    SAVE-EMT Program

    A graduate of a special program at LaGuardia Community College receives his certificate in EMT training.


    Long Island City, NY (March 6, 2017)—The TimesLedger, which publishes 13 weekly newspapers throughout the borough of Queens, recently published an article about the ending ofLaGuardia’s SAVE-EMT program, a free program that helped nearly 400 underemployed and unemployed New Yorkers train to work as emergency medical technicians, while at the same time LaGuardia’s Center for Immigrant Education and Training has a new partnership with Catholic Migration Services to provide New Yorkers with access to free U.S. citizenship classes and legal services. The new program is predicted to prepare approximately 200 New Yorkers for the U.S. citizenship examination.


    Read the full article: LaGuardia Community College Loses EMT Program but Gains Citizenship Classes


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     LaGuardia Goes Back-To-Back; Knocks Off BMCC for 2nd Straight Title
    LaGuardia Goes Back-To-Back; Knocks Off BMCC for 2nd Straight Title

    LaGuardia Goes Back-To-Back; Knocks Off BMCC for 2nd Straight Title


    Long Island City, NY (February 17, 2017)—LaGuardia and BMCC put on a show Friday night at Borough of Manhattan Community College in a rematch of last year’s CUNYAC/Army ROTC Community College Men’s Basketball Championship. These two evenly matched teams gave us another classic as the LaGuardia Red Hawks took down the BMCC Panthers by the score of 82-69. The Red Hawks overcame an early deficit on the road to knock off the Panthers for a second consecutive year and repeat as CUNYAC champions thanks in large part to the play of their outstanding sophomore Mahlik Sherlock who scored 17 second half points in the comeback win.


    Please click here to read full story.

     First Graduates from Novel High School Equivalency Program for Deaf Students at LaGuardia Community College
    First Graduates from Novel High School Equivalency Program for Deaf Students at LaGuardia Community College

    First Graduates from Novel High School Equivalency Program for Deaf Students

    LaGuardia Community College President Dr. Gail O. Mellow and staff from LaGuardia's Program for Deaf Adults with the First Graduates from the National External Diploma Program


    Long Island City, NY (February 6, 2017)—LaGuardia Community College’s Program for Deaf Adults recently celebrated the first deaf students to earn their high school equivalency diplomas through a pilot of an alternative program that better accommodates deaf and hard-of-hearing learners.


    The program, the National External Diploma Program (NEDP)®, was recently approved by the New York State Board of Regents as an alternative pathway to a high school equivalency diploma.


    This is the first-ever implementation of NEDP through the use of American Sign Language (ASL), which is the preferred language for many deaf and hard-of-hearing persons, and the first time it has been used at a CUNY college.


    “Once again, our Program for Deaf Adults is pioneering pathways to help narrow education and earnings gaps between deaf and hard-of-hearing persons as compared with their hearing counterparts,” said LaGuardia Community College President Gail O. Mellow. “These graduates are now ready to pursue their college degrees, so I hope that the next time I shake their hands will be when they earn their associate’s degrees from LaGuardia.”


    The graduating students are Channel Arthur and Pamela Manzueta, both of NYC. They both finished high school with Individualized Education Program (IEP) diplomas, which meant that in order to attend college or qualify for many jobs, they needed to earn their high school equivalency diplomas. However, they had both failed the high school equivalency test—despite coming very close to receiving a passing score.


    “For many members of the deaf community, ASL is their first and primary language. As a result, coursework or tests that rely on complex written prose, such as the high school equivalency exam, can be challenging,” said Lakshmi “Sasha” Ponappa, Director of LaGuardia's Program for Deaf Adults. “The fact that we are able to integrate ASL in a meaningful way through NEDP offers many built-in advantages for our students.”


    The pilot program at LaGuardia was provided tuition-free, through a grant from CUNY’s Workforce Development Initiative, with supplemental funding from LaGuardia’s Thomas Samuels Scholarship Fund. Additional support was provided by Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment Systems, the organization that owns and administers NEDP, and the New York State Education Department.


    LaGuardia’s Program for Deaf Adults is currently actively seeking new funding in order to continue and expand the NEDP program to other deaf and hard-of-hearing students who want to earn their high school equivalency diploma.


    “We’re also investigating whether the program could be administered remotely using videoconferencing technologies, enabling deaf and hard-of-students in any area of the country to earn their high school equivalency diploma,” said Pacts Cartagna, Project Coordinator for LaGuardia’s NEDP, and Coordinator of Continuing Education Programs for LaGuardia's Program for Deaf Adults.


    Education and Earnings Disparities among Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Population


    Data shows that deaf and hard-of-hearing adults have lower rates of high school and college graduation, and relatedly, higher rates of unemployment and lower family incomes, as compared to the general U.S. population. Click here for data on hearing loss among the U.S. population.


    “Channel and Pamela, like many of our deaf and hard-of-hearing students who have taken the high school equivalency exam but not passed it, were extremely hard working and held high school skills, but had difficulty expressing those skills in the format of the test,” said Sue Livingston, PhD, a professor in the Program for Deaf Adults, and in the Department of Education and Language Acquisition. “Unfortunately, these challenges are a cause of educational and earnings disparities among the deaf and hard-of-hearing population.”


    Drive to Find New Route to High School Equivalency for Deaf & Hard-of-Hearing Students


    After seeing too many deaf and hard-of-hearing students come close to passing the high school equivalency exam but failing, Dr. Livingston began searching for an alternative method that would better accommodate deaf students. A LaGuardia colleague, Amy Dalsimer, Executive Director of the College and Career Pathways Institute and Director of Pre-College Academic Programming, suggested NEDP to Dr. Livingston, who was immediately intrigued.


    NEDP is self-led and directed; rather than classes, much of the learning is done by each participant on their own time—enabling students who work full-time or have family responsibilities to participate without having to rearrange their personal schedules. Each student works independently and with advisors and assessors to fulfill 70 competencies in eight areas that include civic literacy, consumer awareness, geography, history and science. Within these areas, which are based on skills outlined in common core College and Career-Ready standards, participants demonstrate high school level abilities by applying them to real-life situations.


    “Unlike the high school equivalency exam, NEDP gives students multiple opportunities to accrue and demonstrate competencies through mini-tests, known as in-office checks. There isn’t just one test that students must pass,” said Dr. Livingston, who initiated the pilot program.


    “We made some creative accommodations to NEDP for our deaf and hard-of-hearing students. For example, each program assessor provided ASL access that was needed to submit verbal responses to examiners, and each student worked with an ASL-fluent tutor who provided assistance on an as-needed basis,” said Cartagna.


    Next Steps after Successful Pilot of NEDP for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students at LaGuardia Community College


    “Given the success of this pilot, we’re ready to enroll a greater number of deaf and hard-of-hearing students in our NEDP program. The practical life skills it teaches will better prepare young adults like Channel and Pamela, to lead independent lives as productive members of the workforce,” said Dr. Livingston. “We’re so proud of Channel and Pamela, and look forward to watching them take their next steps towards achieving their professional goals.”


    Both Arthur and Manzueta plan to enroll at LaGuardia to pursue their associate's degrees, in the near future.


    “Earning my high school equivalency diploma means everything to me. I decided to participate in LaGuardia's NEDP program in order to better my life,” said Arthur, who plans to open her own business in the future. “LaGuardia’s Program for Deaf Adults staff gave me help and support that kept me going when I was juggling full-time work and school.”


    “Now I'm on my way to earning my college degree and becoming a teacher,” said Manzueta, age 27 of Richmond Hill, Queens. “Pacts and the rest of the Program for Deaf Adults faculty and staff truly had my back since the first day I enrolled. They knew how much I wanted to earn my high school equivalency diploma because I want to be successful, and they supported me every step of the way.”


    • • • •


    About LaGuardia’s Program for Deaf Adults
    The Program for Deaf Adults at LaGuardia Community College is the largest, most comprehensive post-secondary program for deaf and hard-of-hearing students in the greater New York metropolitan region. The program recently marked 40 years of helping deaf and hard-of-hearing students pursue their higher education goals—including more than 10,200 LaGuardia students in the past ten years alone.


    The program supports students pursuing associate’s degrees—with special sections of Basic Skills Reading, Writing, and Math taught in ASL. As well, it offers courses taught in ASL, such as high school equivalency, adult basic education, and driver’s education. Through its ASL-English Interpretation Program, ASL-fluent individuals are trained to become ASL-English interpreters. Additional services include classroom interpreters, tutors, note takers, testing accommodation support, as well as academic, personal and job development advisors and other support services.


    About LaGuardia Community College
    LaGuardia Community College, located in Long Island City, Queens, educates more than 50,000 New Yorkers annually through degree, certificate, and continuing education programs. Our guiding principle Dare To Do More reflects our belief in the transformative power of education—not just for individuals, but for our community and our country—creating pathways for achievement and safeguarding the middle class. LaGuardia is a national voice on behalf of community colleges, where half of all US college students study. Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), the College reflects the legacy of our namesake, Fiorello H. LaGuardia, the former NYC mayor beloved for his championing the underserved. Since our doors opened in 1971, our programs regularly become national models for pushing boundaries to give people of all backgrounds access to a high quality, affordable college education. We invite you to join us in imagining what our students, our community, and our country can become. Visit www.LaGuardia.edu to learn more.


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     President Mellow Reflects on Gov. Cuomo’s Tuition-Free College Proposal in interview with Evolllution
    President Mellow Reflects on Gov. Cuomo’s Tuition-Free College Proposal in Interview with Evolllution

    Tuition-Free College Proposal


    Long Island City, NY (February 3, 2017)—LaGuardia Community College President Gail O. Mellow recently spoke with Evolllution, an online news publication focused on higher education, about Governor Cuomo’s Excelsior Scholarship proposal.


    Dr. Mellow defined the enormous impact the Excelsior Scholarship would have on New Yorkers—helping financially struggling students to pay tuition, encouraging those who had presumed that a college degree was unobtainable for them, and more.


    Read full article: Making Tuition-Free College a Reality in New York


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     LaGuardia English Language Coordinator and Volunteers Recognized as NY1s Queens People of the Week
    LaGuardia English Language Coordinator, and Volunteers,
    Recognized as NY1’s Queens People of the Week



    LaGuardia English Language Coordinator, and Volunteers, Recognized as NY1’s Queens People of the Week


    Long Island City, NY (January 31, 2017)—The English Language Center (TELC) at LaGuardia Community College is the largest English language program in New York City. Since 1971, TELC has helped more than 275,000 students from over 80 countries improve their English reading, writing, and speaking skills.


    NY1 recently honored Margaret Culhane, TELC’s Language Clinic Coordinator, and the volunteers who work with English language learners through the program, as Queens People of the Week.


    Each year, Culhane seeks outapprox. 100-150 volunteers to work with between 1500 and 1800 English language learners in small group conversation and one-on-one writing tutoring sessions at the Center’s ESL Practice Program (formerly called the Language Clinic).


    Said Elizabeth Iannotti, director of TELC, “Ms. Culhane runs our very demanding tutoring center, interviewing volunteer tutors, training them, matching them with students in pairs (for writing support) or groups (for speaking support. She has an incredible knack for determining each student’s needs and each tutor’s strengths, and making a pair or group that collaborates well for our eight week tutoring cycle… It is noteworthy that our day student population is a combination of international and immigrant students aged 18 to 60 from over 80 countries. She handles this diversity handily, making it all come together to create tremendous extracurricular learning opportunities for our students. In spite of the stress of her position, she makes every student and volunteer tutor feel welcome and valued. The atmosphere she creates at the tutoring sessions is one of caring and support, even while having high expectations on all of those who participate.”


    See the NY1 story here: Queens People of the Week Help Immigrants Achieve American Dream



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     LaGuardia Community College Launches New Citizenship & Legal Services Program
    New Citizenship & Legal Services Program
    Launches at LaGuardia Community College


    FREE Program to Help NYC Immigrants Become Citizens—Educational Services by LaGuardia’s Center for Immigrant Education and Training and Legal Services by Catholic Migration Services


    LaGuardia Community College Launches New Citizenship & Legal Services Program


    Long Island City, NY (January 27, 2017)—LaGuardia Community College’s Center for Immigrant Education and Training has partnered with Catholic Migration Services, a non-profit legal services organization, to provide New Yorkers with access to free U.S. citizenship classes and legal services. The new program is supported by a two-year $250,000 Citizenship and Integration grant from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services.


    “This new program is exactly what our nation needs right now: provide education and legal assistance to help immigrant New Yorkers of good standing to make the United States their home with all the rights and privileges that come with being a U.S. citizen—being able to vote, to serve as a sponsor for family members to move to the U.S. from other countries, and more,” said LaGuardia Community College President Gail O. Mellow.


    The first class began earlier this month and more classes will be offered over the next two years. New Yorkers from all five boroughs are eligible to apply for the program. The program aims to assist low-income, low and intermediate level adult English language learners improve their English skills.


    For many immigrants, speaking English enables them to have better communication with their children’s teachers and with healthcare professionals, and supports advancements in their careers. For example, according to American Community Survey three-year estimates, nearly 48 percent of residents in community districts adjacent to LaGuardia’s report speaking English “less than very well.”


    LaGuardia’s program is expected to prepare approximately 200 New Yorkers for the U.S. citizenship examination. Twenty-five will be enrolled every three months for an 11-week program. Participants must be legal permanent residents with a valid Green Card in order to participate. For a complete list of eligibility requirements and to submit a request to attend an upcoming information session about the course, click here.


    Through LaGuardia’s Center for Immigrant Education and Training, participants will review material for the English language skills and civics portions of the U.S. citizenship test—including coursework to improve English reading/writing/speaking skills for those who need it. Classes will be held on weekday evenings (6:30 p.m.—9 p.m.) to better accommodate those with full-time jobs.


    “Our English as a second language programs have become national models for the use of contextualized instruction—in which industry-specific materials are used to teach basic academic and technical skills,” said John Hunt, LaGuardia’s Executive Director for Adult Community Learning. “In this English and Citizenship program, U.S. history and civics information will be integrated into English language skills coursework. Students will, for example, improve their English skills by reading about the U.S. Constitution, and will practice speaking English by talking about our branches of government.


    “Studies have shown that adult learners are much more engaged in coursework if they believe the material is directly relevant to them,” said Hunt.


    Over 9,000 adults have been served by LaGuardia’s Center for Immigrant Education and Training since it opened in 2001. It has been ranked highly proficient in New York State Education Department’s adult education report card rating each fiscal year. And in 2011, the Center received a National Council for Continuing Education and Training Exemplary Program Award.


    Partnering with LaGuardia on this program is Catholic Migration Services. For 46 years, Catholic Migration Services has been providing legal services to low-income immigrants, regardless of religion, ethnicity, or race. Every year, Catholic Migration Services helps hundreds of immigrants become U.S. citizens. “We are very excited about our new partnership with LaGuardia. Our program will provide the integrated educational and legal services that immigrants need to become citizens,” said David Colodny, Esq., Director of Legal Services, Catholic Migration Services. This grant supports CMS in providing naturalization legal services to 250 lawful permanent residents over two years.


    New Yorkers interested in this program should visit the Center for Immigrant Education and Training at LaGuardia Community College in person, located at 29-10 Thomson Avenue, Room C-239, Long Island City, Queens, NY 11101. Or call the Center for Immigrant Education and Training at (718)-482-5460.


    For information on accessing free naturalization legal services from Catholic Migration Services, click here.


    To watch a NY1 story about the program, click here.


    • • • •


    About LaGuardia Community College
    LaGuardia Community College, located in Long Island City, Queens, educates more than 50,000 New Yorkers annually through degree, certificate, and continuing education programs. Our guiding principle Dare To Do More reflects our belief in the transformative power of education—not just for individuals, but for our community and our country—creating pathways for achievement and safeguarding the middle class. LaGuardia is a national voice on behalf of community colleges, where half of all US college students study. Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), the College reflects the legacy of our namesake, Fiorello H. LaGuardia, the former NYC mayor beloved for his championing the underserved. Since our doors opened in 1971, our programs regularly become national models for pushing boundaries to give people of all backgrounds access to a high quality, affordable college education. We invite you to join us in imagining what our students, our community, and our country can become. Visit www.LaGuardia.edu to learn more.


    About CIET
    LaGuardia Community College’s Center for Immigrant Education and Training provides high-quality education to enable ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages) learners to become life-long learners and independent, contributing citizens of New York. The Center offers free ESOL classes, which use innovative strategies where coursework draws from specific careers and job training programs, along with career counseling and case management services to low-income immigrant adults. Visit http://www.laguardia.edu/ciet/ to learn more.


    About Catholic Migration Services
    Catholic Migration Services (CMS) is a nonprofit legal services provider, whose mission is to serve and empower low-income immigrants in Brooklyn and Queens, regardless of religion, national origin, or ethnicity. Since 1971, CMS has helped tens of thousands of immigrants adjust their immigration status, obtain asylum, become US citizens, and receive other forms of immigration relief.
    In addition to immigration legal services, CMS provides housing and workers’ rights legal services, as well as community outreach to thousands of immigrants annually.


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