• CTL Seminars 2016-2017


    For 2016-2017, the CTL’s professional development program will offer multiple opportunities for LaGuardia faculty to improve their knowledge and skills while strengthening the College’s key strategic directions and exploring compelling contemporary themes. Digital Learning and the Core Competencies will take center stage in this effort, while at the same time we continue the critical work of fostering first-year student success and strengthening team-based advisement. The Competencies—Integrative Learning, Global Learning, and Inquiry and Problem Solving--and the three communication abilities (Oral, Written, and Digital) will be central to all CTL programming. Integrating the Competencies into specific areas of inquiry through assignment design, careful utilization of the assessment rubrics, and thinking through disciplinary implications will be key activities across the seminars. Explorations of digital affordances will be as well, whether to foster inquiry and integrated learning experiences, or to extend and deepen communicative capacities, or to capture the connective and multiplicative power of networks and online communities.

    As with the Core Competencies, fostering effective modes of digital learning will center on assignment design and consideration of disciplinary implications. Another programming direction, funded by Project AVANZAR, LaGuardia’s current Title V program, will support specific seminars on inquiry-based learning and advisement for faculty in the STEM disciplines. Finally, opportunities to teach the First-Year Seminar will continue to grow as we offer seminars both for new FYS instructors, and one-semester mini-seminars for experienced FYS teachers who wish to strengthen their practice in specific areas. As always, all CTL’s professional development seminars will be sites of reflective collaboration, where colleagues from a range of departments and programs have the time and space to explore, converse, share, and learn from each other. Wherever your interest lies, participation in CTL seminars will help you meet your professional goals while working closely with colleagues and building your ability to help LaGuardia’s students succeed.

    For a printable listing of all 2016-17 Seminars, see this pdf document. For full descriptions and links to the applications, click on the seminar's name below. 

  • UPCOMING SEMINARS 2016 - 2017


    Advising in the STEM Disciplines is a professional development seminar for faculty from the Natural Sciences and Math, Engineering, and Computer Science Departments. Supported by LaGuardia's Title V grant, Project AVANZAR, Advising in the STEM Disciplines is one of four grant-funded activities (along with building new academic programs, strengthening inquiry-based pedagogies, and revisioning developmental math) focused on strengthening STEM education at the College.

    Co-led by CTL staff and by Holly Porter-Morgan (NS) and Mahdi Majidi-Zolbanin (MEC), this seminar will prepare faculty to help STEM students succeed in their studies and plan their academic and professional futures in these fields. Focused on strengthening LaGuardia's team-based advising structure, the seminar will offer participants opportunity to build new advising strategies and strengthen existing ones.

    The seminar will be offered in a three-day format, with two full-day meetings early in the semester and a third scheduled later in the term, when participants report back on their advisement work. Seminar activities will review general advisement basics regarding LaGuardia’s structures, processes, and tools, and then focus on these key areas:
    • Understanding the STEM student's academic path;
    • Understanding advisement beyond course selection;
    • Informing students about STEM transfer and career options;
    • Guiding students toward internships, lab experiences, and fieldwork;
    • Utilizing the ePortfolio-based Graduation Plan to provide advisement continuity beyond the LMF, ECF, and NSF First-Year Seminars;
    • Strategizing to strengthen the team-based advisement model.



    • ELIGIBILITY

      This seminar is open to faculty in the Natural Sciences and Mathematics, Engineering, and Computer Science Departments.


    • SUPPORT

      In recognition of his or her effort, and contingent upon attendance and active participation in all seminar activities, each participant will receive a stipend of $500.



    • DATES

      All meetings are Fridays from 9:00 - 4:00.

      Fall 2016: September 9, September 16, November 4

      or

      Spring 2017: January 20, January 27, April 21

    • INQUIRIES

      Marzena Bugaj ( mbugaj@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5455)
      Holly Porter-Morgan ( hporter-morgan@lagcc.cuny.edu, x6181)







    LaGuardia's new First Year Seminar (FYS) has resulted in a generation of LaGuardia students uniquely focused on their learning and the path toward graduation, advanced education and future careers. After the FYS, they continue on in their major, supported by faculty, advisors, peers, and an array of learning experiences on campus and beyond. By the time LaGuardia students arrive at the Capstone course in their majors, they have accumulated a wealth of education and experiences. But how does it all fit together? How does a student’s learning in one course connect to that of another? How have the student’s introductory courses set the stage for what follows? How—if at all—do the student’s experiences away from LaGuardia fit into the picture? How does the student reflect upon and integrate it all to make sense of the whole before transitioning to what lies beyond the College? And, most importantly, how does all of this come together to serve as a launching pad for a student’s next steps after LaGuardia? The Capstone and Integrative Learning seminar brings faculty together to study best practices in Capstone courses nationwide and strengthen and refresh our own Capstone curriculum here at LaGuardia.

    Five years ago, the college focused on "Rethinking the Capstone Experience." Out of that work, many revised Capstone courses emerged, focused on integration and transition. However, the FYS, our new Core Competencies, our new advisement structure, and the many other changes underway at LaGuardia and across higher education suggest that now is a good time to refresh the Capstone to ensure we are helping students with a meaningful pathway to their next steps. Through explorations of recent scholarship and engagement with functional models both local and external to the College, seminar participants will consider a number of questions critical to Capstone pedagogy, including:
    • How Capstone courses can help students to integrate their learning experiences at LaGuardia, across semesters and disciplines, both inside and outside of the classroom;
    • How the Capstone can best help launch the student toward their next steps in advanced education and/or career;
    • How the advisement process culminates in the Capstone, building on the integrative Graduation Plan modules developed for the FYS ePortfolios; What role the Core Competencies play in Capstone work;
    • How the Capstone provides a critical opportunity to deepen and capture a student's longitudinal learning at the college;
    • How the Capstone course can benefit from connections with advising teams;
    • How Capstone aims differ across departments and programs, and between community- and four-year colleges;
    • What role Capstones play in institutional assessment; and
    • How ePortfolio can help scaffold Capstone pedagogy.


    Through participation in the seminar, faculty enjoy a supported opportunity to review, revise, experiment, and then implement new pedagogies in a targeted capstone course.


    • ELIGIBILITY

      Faculty attending this seminar must be scheduled to teach a Capstone course in Spring 2017.



    • SUPPORT

      In recognition of effort, and contingent upon attendance and completion of all seminar activities, each faculty participant will receive a stipend of $1,250.



    • DATES

      Opening Institute: Wednesday, September 7, 2016 from 10 a.m.—1 p.m.
      Fall 2016 Meeting Dates: all meetings are on Thursdays from 2:30-4:30 p.m. on September 22, October 20, November 17, and December 8.
      Mid-Winter Institute: Thursday, February 23, 2017 from 10 a.m. – 1 p.m.
      Spring 2017 Meeting Dates: all meetings are on Thursdays from 2:30-4:30 p.m on March 9, April 20, May 18, June 8

    • INQUIRIES

      J. Elizabeth Clark ( lclark@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5665)







    The place of ePortfolio at LaGuardia is changing and growing quickly. Thousands of our entering students are now using ePortfolio in First-Year Seminars, combining an introduction to their major with “College 101” skills, exploration of goals, and structured educational planning. Building on the FYS experience, academic programs are strengthening existing strategies, and building new ones, for longitudinal use of ePortfolios from the First-Year Seminar to the capstone course. Implementation of the Integrative Learning Core Competency and Digital Communication Ability across curricula is highlighting ePortfolio’s capacity to connect diverse experiences and strengthen student-centered online learning. Faculty and staff advisers are discovering the value of ePortfolio for advising with depth and attention to students’ development over time.

    In the CTL’s Connected Learning seminar, participants learn to apply ePortfolio pedagogy by actively exploring key concepts in the field, such as integrative learning, reflective practice, and social pedagogy. They pursue both conceptual and practical goals, create their own seminar and course-based ePortfolios, and become skilled users of the Digication platform. The seminar intentionally models a classroom environment in which principles of inquiry, reflection, and integration organize participants’ activities and learning design. Participants learn about the varieties of ePortfolio practice at LaGuardia and at other colleges, and spend the Fall semester devising a pedagogical strategy for delivery in a Spring semester course. The Connected Learning seminar prepares faculty to implement pedagogies with a proven record of elevating students’ performance while strengthening their sense of self and purpose.

    Connected Learning is open to faculty new to ePortfolio and to experienced practitioners. Specific goals for this seminar include:
    • Introducing faculty who are new to ePortfolio to its technology and pedagogy, building on best practices from the national field;
    • Connecting ePortfolio pedagogy to LaGuardia’s new Core Competencies, with special focus on Integrative Learning and Digital Communication;
    • Exploring approaches to reflective practice and social pedagogy;
    • Considering the place of ePortfolio within a larger ecosystem of contemporary online learning;
    • Supporting and contributing to use of ePortfolio across academic programs;

    Connected Learning 2016-17 will be co-facilitated by Michele De Goeas-Malone (Education and Language Acquisition), Ellen Quish (CTL), and Preethi Radhakrishnan (Natural Science).


    • ELIGIBILITY

      This seminar is open to all full-time Academic Affairs and Adult and Continuing Education faculty, as well as to long-term, part-time faculty and Student Affairs staff who are teaching classes. No previous experience teaching with ePortfolio is required, but applicants should possess a general proficiency with Web-based applications and a willingness to experiment with a new platform. Experienced ePortfolio practitioners who wish to continue the supported growth of their pedagogy are welcome to apply.



    • SUPPORT

      In recognition of her or his effort, and contingent upon attendance and active participation, each Academic Affairs faculty participant will receive a stipend of $1,250.



    • DATES

      Fridays, 9am-1pm unless otherwise noted
      6/10 (Kickoff), 9/16 (9am-4pm), 10/14, 11/11, 12/9, 2/17(9am - 4pm), 3/24, 4/21, 5/12, 6/2.

    • INQUIRIES

      Ellen Quish ( equish@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5382)







    The online lives of students continually evolve alongside the Internet’s ever-growing role in culture and society. Educational environments need to meet these constant changes, and online or hybrid courses are a major part of LaGuardia’s online strategy. Hybrid or “blended” courses connect instructors and students alike to the rich possibilities of the internet and web-centered learning while retaining face-to-face class time and offering scheduling flexibility to students with very busy lives. We know that online learning is most effective when learning goals and pedagogical methods determine technology strategies and are built around widely accepted good teaching and learning practices.

    As LaGuardia implements the new Core Competencies—Integrative Learning, Global Learning, Inquiry/Problem Solving and the new Digital Communication ability—online learning will provide abundant opportunity for creative, meaningful assignment and course design. The hybrid/online seminar will offer faculty from across the disciplines a year-long structure for designing and delivering hybrid or fully online courses. We will explore effective pedagogy, assignment and assessment design, create a clear plan for dividing work between the online environment and the classroom, and align technology use with academic goals. Faculty will broaden their practice by engaging in peer feedback, project evaluation processes, and sharing their work with seminar participants. This seminar is open to faculty with limited or no experience teaching hybrid or online classes. Faculty accepted to this seminar will be expected to teach a hybrid or online class in the spring 2017 semester. Knowledge of Blackboard, ePortfolio or other online learning systems will be helpful but is not a requirement.

    To provide faculty new to hybrid or online learning environments with an authentic experience of being learners in a hybrid environment, some sessions will take place online and others face-to-face.


    • ELIGIBILITY

      The program is open to faculty in Academic Affairs and Adult and Continuing Education eligible to teach hybrid or online classes.


    • SUPPORT

      Faculty in Academic Affairs who have successfully completed the seminar, contingent upon attendance and active participation, will receive a stipend of $1,250.



    • DATES

      Please note that some sessions will be held online. Face-to-face seminars will meet on Thursday afternoons from 3:30 to 5:30, unless otherwise noted.
      Full-day Orientation Institute: Friday, June 17, 2016, 9:30 to 4:00
      Fall I, 2016—Thursdays, 3:30 – 5:30: Sept. 22, Oct. 27, Nov. 17, and Dec. 15
      Mid-year Institute 2017 – Two half-day seminars:
      Friday, January 13, Face to Face, 9:30 – 12:30
      Friday, February 3, 2017, Online, 9:30 – 12:30
      Spring I, 2017—Thursday, 3:30 – 5:30: March 9, April 6, May 11, and June 1

    • INQUIRIES

      Josephine Corso ( jcorso@lagcc.cuny.edu), x5416
      Jade Davis ( jadavis@lagcc.cuny.edu), x7563
      Dionne Miller, Natural Science Dept. ( dmiller@lagcc.cuny.edu), x5741






    In an age of social media, digital connectedness, and rapidly changing expectations of work and personal interactions with technology, what is the role of the digital pedagogue? What role does technology play in our disciplines, in the classroom, in our curriculum, in our lives? How do faculty and students alike negotiate the powerful world of digital technology and learn what it means to live, teach, and work with a carefully considered digital identity? How does technology afford us new opportunities to think about scholarship and collaboration with students in new areas of open educational resources: scholarly, scientific, and creative? What are the ethical responsibilities of faculty who work with new and emerging technologies? How might we use technology to leverage what happens in our classrooms to share with the outside world so that our knowledge serves everyone?​

    What does a carefully and intentionally designed digital pedagogy look like? This seminar will focus on the philosophical, the pedagogical, and the personal. What does technology mean in our lives today? How are we all "Dancing with Robots" as we look towards the future? How does technology impact the classroom and curriculum? What are the best ways to seamlessly integrate technology as a complement to what we already do? Where do we need to make affordances for new technology? When is it okay to ignore or exclude technology in the classroom? How do our personal choices about technology outside of the classroom impact our pedagogical choices?

    Now in its second year, this seminar asks how to create a digital classroom with intention instead of adding on bells and whistles for effect. Participants will engage key questions and issues around "the digital" both theoretically, through the lens of shared texts, and practically, through hands-on, how-to application of the principles we explore to the classroom environment. We will explore emerging models for scaffolding digital production with students, engaging in questions of how to publish, teach, and mentor in today's higher ed environment. This seminar will also help participants to design assignments more effectively for both the Integrative Learning and Digital Communication competencies as exciting, engaging points of entry for curriculum design.​


    • ELIGIBILITY

      This seminar is open to all full-time Academic Affairs and Adult and Continuing Education faculty, as well as to long-term, part-time faculty and Student Affairs staff who are teaching classes. This seminar is appropriate for faculty who already have some familiarity with technology, social media, and popular digital platforms.



    • SUPPORT

      In recognition of her or his effort, and contingent upon attendance and active participation, each Academic Affairs faculty participant will receive a stipend of $1,250.



    • DATES

      Mondays 2:30 - 5:00 pm unless indicated:
      9/19, 10/24, 11/21, 12/12
      Mid-year Institute Friday January 20, 10am - 3pm
      Mondays 2:30 - 5:00 pm
      3/20, 4/24, 5/22, 6/12



    • INQUIRIES

      Priscilla Stadler ( pstadler@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5489)

      Liz Clark ( lclark@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5665)
      Jade Davis ( jadavis@lagcc.cuny.edu, x7563)






    LaGuardia's team-based advisement structure is maturing--it is no longer a "model" but an active set of advisement practices embracing faculty, staff, and student peers, organized around academic programs and Student Affairs offices. This one-semester seminar, led by a team of CTL staff, faculty, and Student Affairs professionals, provides practical and immediately applicable knowledge for faculty and staff engaged in advisement. The seminar provides opportunities to learn in two basic advisement areas:

    Informational: What knowledge is needed about programs, policies, and procedures?
    Relational: What skills are needed to communicate effectively as an advisor?

    To meet these goals, participants learn about LaGuardia’s advisement structure and practice the use of the most important advisement technologies and resources, including Degree Audit, the Advising Portal, and ePortfolios in First-Year Seminars. Other seminar topics include introductions to the fundamentals of registration and grading processes, course sequencing and selection, financial aid, and educational planning. Participants learn the distinctions between and appropriate roles of prescriptive, developmental, and teaching-based advisement. Seminar resources include retrievable documentation designed to aid advisers beyond their time in the seminar. Seminar assignments include advisement activity with Degree Audit and ePortfolios, and face-to-face advisement practice with students. Foundations of Advising will help faculty and staff advisers navigate critical aspects of the LaGuardia student experience while providing hands-on opportunities to explore College advisement resources. Participants will gain a sound base of knowledge and skills needed to provide effective advisement and to help students clarify and achieve their goals.


    • ELIGIBILITY

      Foundations of Advising is open to all faculty and staff in Academic Affairs and Student Affairs.




    • SUPPORT

      In recognition of her or his effort, and contingent upon attendance and active participation in all seminar activities, each faculty participant will receive a stipend of $500.



    • DATES

      The seminar will be offered in two separate three-meeting sequences. Participants should register for only one of these sessions, scheduled as follows:

      Fall 2016: Fridays from 9:00 - 4:00 on 9/23, 9/30 and 11/18

      Spring 2017: Fridays from 9:00 - 4:00 on 3/24, 3/31, and 5/19

    • INQUIRIES

      Marzena Bugaj ( mbugaj@lagcc.cuny.edu), ext.5455
      Linda Chandler ( lchandler@lagcc.cuny.edu), ext.5910 






    How has our relationship with technology changed in our lifetimes, and what does this mean for the future? How does technology change our relationships, our use of resources, our bodies, and our very understanding of humans and consciousness? What does it mean to live at a time when - according to some experts - we are on the brink of an intelligence explosion? Faculty interested in learning and teaching about any of these (and other) questions related to technology, superintelligence/AI, and/or transhumanism are invited to apply for this one-semester seminar. Readings, tools and resources will be provided for faculty in any discipline interested in helping students explore aspects of ethical, legal, medical, economic, privacy, cultural and other issues related to advanced technologies, and their relevance in their discipline. Faculty will be able to (1) learn from colleagues about aspects of advanced technologies and their potential impacts, and (2) develop a learning activity for students about the relationship between humans and intelligent machines.

    Funded in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities, this seminar grows from work done by faculty who participated in the two-year Technology, Self and Society Seminar. Offered in 2014-15 and 2015-16, TSS was targeted for faculty teaching LIB 200 or cluster courses. In Fall 2016, this semester-long seminar will be open to faculty from any discipline teaching any level of course. Faculty colleagues (from the prior TSS seminar) acting as “teachers” represent a range of disciplines, and will also discuss how their class and activities align with core competencies: these “teachers” will be presenting classwork from lower-level and upper-level courses alike. Faculty participants will prepare as “students,” completing assigned readings before the meeting and coming prepared to fully participate in session activities.

    When developing their learning activities for students, seminar members will utilize the rubrics developed for LaGuardia’s Core Competencies and Abilities to guide their assignment design. Learning activities developed by faculty will become part of the CUNY Open Education Resources bank. Participants in the seminar will be accumulating a range of activities and resources that can be used in a variety of interdisciplinary settings, from introductory classes to more advanced study.


    • ELIGIBILITY

      Open to all Academic Affairs and Adult and Continuing Education faculty.



    • SUPPORT

      The seminar consists of 4 face-to-face meetings and online peer critique activities, with three hour meetings. The final meeting will be longer to allow for reflective writing, peer input, and uploading activities to the CUNY OER. Faculty in Academic Affairs who have successfully completed the seminar, contingent upon attendance and active participation, will receive a stipend of $500.



    • DATES

      Tuesday, September 27, 2:30-5:30
      Tuesday, October 18, 2:30-5:30
      Tuesday, November 15, 2:30-5:30
      Friday, December 9, 10:00-2:00

    • INQUIRIES

      Priscilla Stadler (pstadler@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5489)
      Bethany Holmstrom (bholmstrom@lagcc.cuny.edu, x7505)







    The Gender and Diversity Seminar welcomes all faculty who are interested in developing strategies for increased awareness of diversity and increased ability to advance equity and justice in the classroom. The seminar is a cross-disciplinary forum for dialogue, active practice and support aligned with the college’s commitment to Global Learning. The seminar invites faculty to develop their abilities to thoughtfully communicate across difference such as race, gender, class, religion, ethnicity, and sexuality, and to consider the role higher education plays in expanding awareness of privilege, representation and stratification. Participants will consider the ways in which interdependent yet inequitable social systems function in the classroom.The seminar will cultivate pedagogical approaches to classroom diversity while building faculty capacity to apply divergent perspectives and pluralistic views. Understanding diversity and its implications deepens the ability to recognize the origins and influences of one’s own heritage along with its limitations, and use that knowledge to communicate and teach across difference and collaboratively reach common goals.Through a review of literature written by those who have been mis- or underrepresented, we will explore the use of feminist and decentering pedagogical techniques to foster a more student-centered learning environment. These methods encourage a classroom atmosphere which empowers marginalized actors to feel comfortable and equal, create more inclusive classrooms and turn the focus of education toward shared responsibility between students and faculty.

    The seminar will feature readings, discussions, and activities designed to build greater sensitivity toward LaGuardia’s incredibly diverse population. We will engage a broad range of primary sources and apply them to the diversity of the seminar itself (e.g., people of richly diverse backgrounds teaching in many disciplines). Seminar materials include multidisciplinary and multimodal forms of expression applicable to many disciplines, and modelling of pedagogical techniques to analyze seminar readings and to apply their insights to our classroom strategies.

    The use and practice of these techniques will create opportunities for faculty to approach Global Learning as knowledge acquired cumulatively across disciplines and students’ entire college career through an institution’s curricular and co-curricular programming. Discovering how diversity and inclusiveness can be built into the courses we teach will strengthen their impact on the “whole student”-- the student who belongs to a heterogeneous universe that includes family, work, school, past experiences and future expectations, and create opportunities for learning which are integrative as well as inclusive.

    Participants will:
    • Be exposed to pedagogical techniques that aim to increase student centered, inquiry-based learning. Participants will become familiar with techniques such as Problem Based Learning (PBL), Collaborative Learning (CL), and Project Oriented Learning (POL), and will be expected to incorporate one of these techniques into the activity they design during the seminar;
    • Create strategies they can use in their classes to strengthen students’ integration of curricular and co-curricular experiences. Drawing from these experiences will turn the classroom into a more respectful, diverse, and cosmopolitan place of learning;
    • Through the lens of seminar readings, discussions, and collaborative sharing and exploration of pedagogical experience, examine and revise their own orientation to diversity and gender expectations/performance, and inclusion of difference in the classroom;
    • Explore LaGuardia’s Core Competencies and their application, with special attention to the Global Learning Competency.
    • Develop an activity that they can use in their classes that clearly addresses issues of diversity, ethics, and inclusion. They will write this activity in three stages: 1) instructional design and assessment; 2) application of the activity during the Spring semester; 3) revision of the activity and reflection on both how the expectations were fulfilled and on any new learning that happened through the activity;
    • Use the seminar as a space to reflect on their own pedagogical practice and their preparedness to teach in a diverse community such as LaGuardia; and,
    • Keep a journal in which they will write down useful ideas they have encountered in the seminar and ways in which these ideas can find a way into their classrooms.



    • ELIGIBILITY

      Open to all Academic Affairs and Adult and Continuing Education faculty.



    • SUPPORT

      In recognition of her or his effort, and contingent upon attendance and active participation, each Academic Affairs faculty participant will receive a stipend of $1,250.



    • DATES

      Tuesdays, 2:30 - 4:30pm 9/20, 9/27, 10/18, 11/1, 11/15, 11/29, 2/21 (Winter online session on 2/21), 3/21, 4/4, 4/25, 5/9, 5/23

    • INQUIRIES

      Michele Piso (mpiso@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5483)
      Dahlia Elsayed (delsayed@lagcc.cuny.edu, x4074)
      Shannon Proctor (sproctor@lagcc.cuny.edu, x4097)







    Hundreds of LaGuardia faculty from departments collegewide have taken part in New to College: ReThinking the First Year Seminar and begun teaching the new, discipline-based First Year Seminar. The FYS has been highly successful, but we all know that there is still much to learn. To support on-going learning and exchange amongst FYS faculty, the Center for Teaching and Learning is offering a trio of advanced Mini-Seminars:
    • Supporting ESL Students in the First Year Seminar (Fall 2016);
    • Building Growth Mindset in the FYS (Fall II, 2017) and
    • Introducing Your Discipline in the FYS (Spring I 2017).
    Each Mini-Seminar will consist of a total of 7.5 seminar hours, taking place in three sessions. To be eligible, faculty must have successfully completed a New to College seminar. Faculty can apply to take part in one Mini-Seminar, or more than one.

    1. Fall I 2016
    Supporting ESL Students in the First Year Seminar

    LaGuardia Community College students hail from countries around the world and speak well over 100 languages. As such, students in your FYS course might be non-native speakers of English who have also placed into an English as a Second Language (ESL) course through LaGuardia’s ELA department, or they may be non-native speakers with an evolving proficiency in English. What strategies help such students succeed in the FYS? How can faculty work with students who are at very different levels of English language proficiency? To better understand and meet these challenges, the Center for Teaching & Learning will offer a three-part mini-seminar, Supporting ESL Students in the First Year Seminar, which will meet on Thursday afternoons during Fall 2016.

    Drawing from faculty experience as well as from ESL learner input, participants will be introduced to strategies that encourage faculty to build on the resources and skills ESL students already bring to the classroom. In addition, ideas for helping ESOL students achieve greater academic success and better navigate the higher education system in the United States will be shared.

    • ELIGIBILITY

      FYS Mini-Seminars are open to full-time and experienced part-time faculty who have completed the New to College Seminar and taught a First-Year Seminar class in any discipline. Student Affairs staff teaching in these departments are also eligible to apply.




    • SUPPORT

      In recognition of effort, and contingent upon regular attendance and active participation, each faculty participant will receive a stipend of $500 per Mini-Seminar.



    • DATES

      Thursday afternoons, from 2:30-5 pm, on the following dates: 9/15, 9/29, and 10/13.

    • INQUIRIES

      Ellen Quish (equish@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5382)




    2. Fall II 2017
    Building Growth Mindset in the FYS


    Mind-set plays a critical role in motivation and achievement. According to Dr. Carol Dweck’s research, when students learn how to “grow their brains” and increase their intellectual abilities, they improve their academic performance. Data from the experiments of LaGuardia’s mathematics faculty, teaching the new MAT119, shows that helping FYS students adopt a growth mind-set, i.e. the belief that their intelligence can grow, positively impacts their achievement and increase their chances of success at LaGuardia.

    To this end, the Center for Teaching and Learning will offer Building Growth Mindset in the FYS, a three-part Mini-Seminar that offers FYS instructors the opportunity to learn strategies that foster growth mindset in FYS students and to plan how to best integrate such an approach into their courses.

    • ELIGIBILITY

      FYS Mini-Seminars are open to full-time and experienced part-time faculty who have completed the New to College Seminar and taught a First-Year Seminar class in any discipline. Student Affairs staff teaching in these departments are also eligible to apply.



    • SUPPORT

      In recognition of effort, and contingent upon regular attendance and active participation, each faculty participant will receive a stipend of $500 per Mini-Seminar.



    • DATES

      Wednesday afternoons, from 2:30-5 pm, on the following dates: 1/11, 1/25 and 2/8

    • INQUIRIES

      Milena Cuellar (mcuellar@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5711)




    3. Spring I 2017
    Introducing Your Discipline in the First Year Seminar


    The introduction to the discipline is defining component of the FYS. Yet faculty feedback suggests that it is challenging to integrate this element into the course in a way that is both substantive and accessible to new students. What does it mean to introduce students to Science, to Business or to Liberal Arts? How can one most effectively combine the introduction to the discipline with the other elements of the course? With these questions in mind, the CTL is offering a three-part Mini-Seminar to help faculty develop assignments that infuse discipline into their respective FYS course and engage students in thinking about their selected majors.

    • ELIGIBILITY

      FYS Mini-Seminars are open to full-time and experienced part-time faculty who have completed the New to College Seminar and taught a First-Year Seminar class in any discipline. Student Affairs staff teaching in these departments are also eligible to apply.



    • SUPPORT

      In recognition of effort, and contingent upon regular attendance and active participation, each faculty participant will receive a stipend of $500 per Mini-Seminar.



    • DATES

      Thursdays from 2:30 - 5 on 3/16, 3/30 and 4/13

    • INQUIRIES

      Ellen Quish (equish@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5382)






    New York is a global city - a site of global commerce, politics, culture and art; Queens is the most ethnically diverse urban area in the world. LaGuardia Community College is a microcosm of these socio-economic and historical trends. How do we teach our Urban Studies courses given this dynamic transnational backdrop? What makes course content “urban?” How can we revise and create assignments that will address the College’s Global Learning Competency? What can we do, college-wide, to help students connect knowledge of the city with disciplinary skills and understanding?

    The Teaching the City seminar offers faculty an opportunity to consider these questions as they rethink and redesign their Urban Studies courses. Faculty will be introduced to new scholarship and provided structured opportunity to design course assignments utilizing the Global Learning competency and assessment rubric. Beyond this, the seminar emphasizes experiential learning. In dialogue with other professors, and from a cross-disciplinary perspective, faculty will investigate ways to use New York City as a teaching and learning lab, discuss experiential curriculum innovations, and develop various ways of incorporating field trip and study abroad ideas into our syllabi and disciplines.


    • ELIGIBILITY

      Open to all faculty teaching or preparing to teach Urban Studies courses.



    • SUPPORT

      In recognition of effort, and contingent upon regular attendance and active participation, each faculty participant will receive a stipend of $1,250.



    • DATES

      Meets on Thursdays 2:30-4:30 pm as follows:

      Fall 2016:
      9/22, 10/6, 10/27, 11/17, 12/8
      Mid year field trip TBD
      Spring 2017: 3/16, 3/30, 4/20, 5/4, 5/25

    • INQUIRIES

      Priscilla Stadler (pstadler@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5489)
      Arianna Martinez (amartinez@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5691)
      Laura Tanenbaum (ltanenbaum@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5747)






    The Writing in the Disciplines program at LaGuardia is part of a nation-wide interdisciplinary effort that explores strategies for improving student writing and using writing as an active learning tool. In 2016/17, WID will be offered as two separate semester-long faculty development seminars (Fall I 2016 and Spring I 2017). Full- and part-time faculty will develop and test writing-intensive assignments that can help students learn course content and develop Inquiry and Problem Solving, Integrative Learning and Global Learning competencies, and revise syllabi to create a Writing Intensive course. Seminars are facilitated by interdisciplinary teams of LaGuardia faculty and Graduate Center Writing Fellows. Faculty interested in teaching Writing Intensive courses, such as Urban Studies and Capstones, must complete the seminar to receive Writing Intensive certification.


    • ELIGIBILITY

      Full and part-time faculty who wish to teach Writing Intensive courses, including Capstone and/or Urban Studies courses, are required to complete WID. The WID program is also open to all vocational/technical faculty (CIS, AMS, or Allied Health) and faculty teaching any course required for completion of a vocational degree.



    • SUPPORT

      In recognition of effort, and contingent upon regular attendance and active participation, each faculty participant will receive a stipend of $500.



    • DATES

      NOTE: FALL SESSION FILLED, PLEASE APPLY FOR SPRING 2017
      Fall 2016: Meets on Mondays, 3:30 - 5:30
      Sept. 12, Sept. 26, Oct. 17, Oct 31, Nov. 14, Nov. 28, Dec. 12

      Spring 2017: the Spring 2017 seminar will have a more flexible schedule, designed to meet the needs of adjunct faculty who would like to be certified to teach a Writing Intensive course. If you are an adjunct or full-time faculty member interested in participating in WID in Spring 2017, please contact Ros Orgel ( roslyno@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5448) and indicate your best days/times.
    • INQUIRIES

      Ros Orgel ( roslyno@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5448)
      Evelyn Burg ( burgev@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5634)
      Michelle Pacht ( mpacht@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5914)






    Seminars and Programs Currently Not Accepting Applications

     


    LaGuardia’s new Global Learning rubric “focuses on transnational economic, political, environmental, physical, social and cultural issues and their implications.” It is designed to encourage students to deepen their understanding of global issues, strengthen their ability to identify a range of global perspectives, demonstrate their awareness of how the world is shaped by global patterns of power, and develop a reflective, ethically engaged understanding of global issues.

    This seminar will provide a forum for discussing these and other questions related to the Global Learning Competency: How can you engage the Global Learning Competency in your classes? What does it mean in your discipline? How can you revise your current course assignments to meet the new competency? How does a global approach make use of the diversity in our classrooms? How can we use the current rubric to assess our students' work in this area? And how do we take advantage of the global knowledge that students at “the world’s community college” already possess?

    Participants will create or revise assignments for use in targeted courses and for assessment deposit utilizing the Global Learning Core Competency rubric. In seminar sessions, we will workshop assignments while exploring a range of approaches to global studies and global learning drawn from multiple disciplines. Additional sessions will be devoted to grading, effective use of rubrics, and ways to bring a new awareness of global learning into your teaching. The seminar will be led by Professors Karen Miller (Social Sciences) and Christopher Schmidt (English).


    • ELIGIBILITY

      The application deadline for 2016-17 has passed. For information, contact Karen Miller (kamiller@lagcc.cuny.edu, x6016) or Christopher Schmidt (cschmidt@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5904). This program is open to all full-time Academic Affairs and ACE faculty. Adjuncts who can commit to attending all seminar meetings are also welcome to apply.




    • SUPPORT

      In recognition of her or his effort, and contingent upon attendance and active participation, each Academic Affairs faculty participant will receive a stipend of $1,250.



    • DATES

      [Meets on Tuesdays, 3:30 - 5:30 unless otherwise noted]
      Opening Institute: Friday, June 17, 10 - 1
      Fall 2016: Sept. 20, Oct. 18, Nov. 8, Nov. 29
      Mid-Winter Institute: Thursday, March 2, 1-4
      Spring 2017: March 21, April 25, May 16
      Wrap-up: Friday, June 1, 10 - 1

    • INQUIRIES

      Karen Miller (kamiller@lagcc.cuny.edu, x6016) or Christopher Schmidt (cschmidt@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5904)







    In this year-long faculty development seminar, designed to assist LaGuardia faculty with their scholarly writing, faculty scholars seek to complete current academic writing projects and place them in external, peer-reviewed journals. LaGuardia faculty scholars from various disciplines—ranging from Accounting to Communication Studies, from Mathematics to English, from Library Science to Sociology —come together to read, critique, and support one another’s writing within their respective fields. Past FSPW participants have benefited from the peer support structure of this seminar and have successfully revised and submitted work subsequently published in peer-reviewed journals. In addition to articles being written for peer-reviewed journals, faculty have worked on dissertation chapters, book proposals, recently published In Transit articles, pedagogical inquiries begun in any of the Center’s seminars (such as the Carnegie Seminar, and ePortfolio), as well as other scholarly pursuits.

    The workshop expects participants to support one another in various phases of publication preparation through constructive criticism and exchange. In previous workshops faculty have discussed and critiqued papers on translation, student video projects, parenting children on the autism spectrum, creole cookery books, workplace diversity, the politics of work and leisure, girls’ rights, and other topics. The workshop process will include careful reading of article drafts, peer discussion, and, very importantly, written comments. It will also include a conversation about identifying publication venues and submission procedures. The workshop leader will also be available for individual consultation.








    The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) is the rigorous and systematic study of student learning, publicly shared, open to peer review and critique, and committed to the collective creation of knowledge. The Carnegie Seminar commits itself to these principles and to LaGuardia’s vision of an integrated culture of evidence-based teaching and learning. Framed by the broad theme of social justice, the 2016-2017 Carnegie Seminar invites the participation of faculty and staff interested in designing SoTL projects that examine the question of mass incarceration, its causes and destabilizing consequences. As described by John Jay College of Criminal Justice President Jeremy Travis in his Opening Sessions address to the LaGuardia community on 3 March 2016, the U.S. prison population has exploded since 1980. “Historically unprecedented and internationally unique”, the staggering increase in U.S. incarceration over the last three decades has underscored wide disparities in race and education. Reaching into all levels of society and manifested in all forms of daily life, these inequities affect all citizens inside or outside of the carceral system. (Please see below for Seminar commitments, eligibility, and schedule.)

    Lines of Inquiry For educators, the social, moral, and aesthetic implications and expressions of social inequities cross disciplines, integrating disciplinary fields and encompassing LaGuardia’s Core Competencies and communication abilities. In preparation of publishable papers and in addition to all other Seminar requirements, participants commit to three seminar presentations (Fall I and II and Spring I) of their evolving qualitative SoTL research about the effects of mass incarceration upon our society and communities. Below are examples of possible lines of Carnegie SoTL investigation and research:
    • Educational inequality;
    • Employment; legal and illegal underground economies;
    • Race and social theory; the effects of harsh penal policies on Black and Hispanic men;
    • Housing, public and private; segregated housing; the urban housing market;
    • Environmental hazards of low-income housing;
    • Single-women and eviction;
    • Children at high and often invisible risk;
    • Parent-child bonds; Intimacy, love, friendship, and family relations;
    • Violence; mental and physical health; drug abuse, drug rehabilitation, and drug laws;
    • Policing; public safety; policing and citizen relations;
    • Race and poverty gaps;
    • Democratic participation;
    • Representations of carceral life in literature, film, music, and philosophy;
    • Experiences and designs of private and public space;
    • Theories of freedom and enslavement; liberty and security; and private and public life;
    • And other.


    Commitments
    The Carnegie Seminar offers participants the dedicated time, space, and critical feedback necessary to pursue these lines of SoTL inquiry and to produce a paper suitable for internal and external publication. Seminar participants commit to contributing their findings to In Transit, LaGuardia’s in-house journal which serves as a staging ground for work to be further revised and submitted for external publication. In the 2016-2017 session of the Carnegie Seminar, participants will:
    • Explore relevant research on causes and consequences of mass incarceration or any of the above themes;
    • Identify teaching and learning opportunities that engage disciplinary and competency-based objectives related to Seminar themes of social justice in general and mass incarceration in particular;
    • Clarify a research question that engages Seminar themes;
    • Explore research approaches, world-view, and method;
    • Design and implement a relevant theme-based classroom intervention;
    • Draft and revise a publishable paper on issues related to disciplinary, competency-based, and qualitative SoTL research along themes relevant to the 2016-2017 Carnegie Seminar;
    • Commit to peer accountability, and immediate and productive feedback on drafts of scholarly inquiry;
    • Contribute to a motivated, positive, and focused environment; and
    • Commit to attend all seminars and institutes


    Co-facilitators of the 2016-2017 Carnegie Seminar: Michele Piso, CTL and Humanities; Jose Fabara, Education and Language Acquisition; and Jennifer Wynn, Social Science.


    • ELIGIBILITY

      The application deadline for 2016-17 has passed. For information, contact Michele Piso ( mpiso@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5483).


      The Carnegie Seminar is open to full-time faculty, CLTs, and long-term part-time faculty; Student Affairs colleagues are also welcome (stipend restrictions apply).


    • SUPPORT

      In recognition of her or his effort, and contingent upon attendance, active participation, and SoTL progress, each Academic Affairs faculty participant will receive a stipend of $1,250.



    • DATES

      Fall I 2016 - Fridays: June 17 (time to be announced)
      Thursdays 3:30 - 5:30: September 8 and 22, October 06 and 20, November 10 and 17, December 1 and 15 (last day of finals)

      Fall II Mid-Winter: TBA (please note: mid-winter sessions are required, in-person, and all day)

      Spring I 2017 - Thursdays: March 9 and 23, April 6 and 20, May 4 and 18, June 15 (time to be announced)

    • INQUIRIES

      Michele Piso ( mpiso@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5483)






    “Reaffirming and strengthening America’s role as the world’s engine of scientific discovery and technological innovation is essential to meeting the challenges of this century,” said President Obama. “That’s why I am committed to making the improvement of STEM education over the next decade a national priority.” The President went on to highlight the particular need to develop students’ critical thinking abilities. (https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/president-obama-launches-educate-innovate-campaign-excellence-science-technology-en)

    LaGuardia’s five year Project AVANZAR grant creates opportunities for STEM faculty to consider ways to use inquiry learning and undergraduate research to more deeply engage students and prepare them for advanced STEM education and career. In 2015-16, a team of LaGuardia faculty from STEM disciplines has been investigating the literature and making recommendations for next steps. What are best practices at LaGuardia and in the broader field? How can we scaffold our curriculum to ensure that all students engage in inquiry learning processes? How and in what ways do we need to revise our assignments and syllabi? What are the implications for our articulation agreements? Building on this process, in 2016-17 the CTL will invite MEC and Natural Sciences faculty to participate in a year-long seminar where we will explore these and related questions, revise assignments, and test new approaches with students.

    Led by faculty from MEC and Natural Sciences and Associate Dean Bret Eynon, participants will:
    • Discuss nationally recognized best practices related to incorporating inquiry and problem-solving in STEM disciplines;
    • Develop and refine assignments that incorporate inquiry and problem-solving skill-building activities;
    • Utilizing LaGuardia’s Inquiry and Problem-Solving rubric, evaluate samples of student work created in response to revised assignments to ensure effectiveness;
    • Discuss existing undergraduate research projects, and explore opportunities for expanding these efforts;
    • Examine possibilities and implications of revising curricula to incorporate more inquiry and problem-solving activities



    • ELIGIBILITY

      The application deadline for 2016-17 has passed. For information, contact Ros Orgel ( roslyno@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5448).

      This program is open to all full-time Mathematics, Engineering, and Computer Science and Natural Science faculty. Adjuncts from these two departments who can commit to attending all seminar meetings and fully participating in seminar related activities are also welcome to apply. Preference will be given to faculty who are scheduled to teach in Spring 2017 one of the disciplinary courses designated to address the Inquiry/Problem Solving competency.



    • SUPPORT

      In recognition of her or his effort, and contingent upon attendance and active participation, each Academic Affairs faculty participant will receive a stipend of $1,250.



    • DATES
      All meetings are on Fridays from 9 - 1, unless noted
      Summer Institute 2016: Wednesday, June 15, 1:00 - 5:00
      Fall 2016: 9/9, 10/14, 11/11, 12/16 , 9:00 – 1:00
      Mid-Winter Institute 2017: 1/13, 2/10, 9:00 - 4:00
      Spring 2017: 3/10, 4/7, 5/5, 6/2, 9:00 – 1:00

    • INQUIRIES

      Ros Orgel ( roslyno@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5448)





    1. Closing the PPR Loop Mini Grants


    Academic programs that completed their Periodic Program Reviews (PPR) in 2014-15 or 2015-16 are now building the structures and processes designed to meet programmatic challenges identified through their PPR work, and to explore new initiatives related to recommendation(s) made during the PPR process. To support this “Closing the Loop” phase of the PPR cycle, the Center for Teaching and Learning is offering mini-grants of up to $7500 for the 2016-17 academic year.

    Mini-grant applications must include a plan for the ways the program will work to incorporate the new general education Core Competencies and Abilities into their curricula, particularly if the PPR examined learning outcomes related to the former college-wide competencies. Proposals should also indicate steps that will be taken, based on the PPR findings and action plan. These may include course development, professional development for full- and/or part-time faculty, improving assessment methodologies, developing new aspects of the program, working with College offices to improve recruitment and retention, improving program-specific tutoring, and other pertinent issues.

    In your application, please include a description of what you expect to accomplish, including the PPR recommendation(s) that your project will address, the way in which the new Core Competencies and Abilities will be integrated into your curriculum, a description of projected activities, and an itemized budget with an explanation of how you plan to use the funds (up to $7500). Proposals are expected to provide clear timelines and specific activities for project development.




    • ELIGIBILITY

      Faculty representing programs in Academic Affairs that completed Periodic Program Reviews in 2015-16, 2014-15, or 2013-14.



    • REQUIREMENTS

      Recipients of this mini- grant are expected to:
      Provide an interim report in January 2017 and a final report in June 2017. Interim and final reports must include a narrative of project activities to date, goals achieved, challenges encountered, plans for next steps, and a budget update with itemized financial expenditures.
      Present the results of the mini- grant to the other participants and to the LAGCC community.
      Attend 6 scheduled mini-grant sessions.

    • SUPPORT

      To support programs’ work in these areas, the Center for Teaching and Learning is offering mini-grants of up to $7500 for the 2016-17 academic year.



    • DATES

      Thursdays, 3:30 - 5:30
      2016 – June 16th, September 22nd, November 17th,
      2017 - January 19th, March 23rd, May 18th

    • INQUIRIES

      Regina Lehman ( rlehman@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5775);
      Justin Rogers-Cooper ( jrogers@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5913)
      Niesha Ziehmke (nziehmke@lagcc.cuny.edu, x6058)


    The application deadline for 2016-17 has passed. For information, contact Niesha Ziehmke ( nziehmke@lagcc.cuny.edu, x6058).



    2. Sustaining Comprehensive Efforts for Connecting Core Competencies into the Curriculum Mini Grants


    Academic departments and programs college-wide are moving forward with efforts to create and implement comprehensive curriculum maps that identify key locations and courses where the new General Education Core Competencies and Abilities can be connected. This work is now moving forward to create mechanisms for both sustaining and examining the initial work and to infuse an understanding of the Core Competencies and Abilities in all courses throughout the curriculum.

    To support these efforts, the Center for Teaching and Learning is offering year-long mini-grants of up to $7500 to support faculty work in these areas. These grants can be used to support department or program-led efforts to engage in projects to more deeply integrate the new General Education Core Competencies and Abilities into curriculum maps, courses, assignments, and pedagogy through the following initiatives:

    a. Cohesive Competency & Ability Development Throughout the Curriculum
    Departmental or programmatic implementation of the new General Education Core Competencies and Abilities in early, middle and late junctures in the programmatic curriculum map. This project will support the conversations and processes that go into scaffolding Core Competency and Ability learning opportunities throughout the students’ experience in the program.

    b. Designing, Developing & Piloting Competency-Based Assignments
    Advancing the work departments or programs are doing to integrate the new Core Competencies and Abilities into specific course-based learning experiences. This project supports assignment design, revision, piloting of revised assignments, examining student artifacts, and using that process to move toward achievable competency-based learning outcomes.

    c. Broad Implementation of Revised Competency & Ability-Based Assignments
    Implementing the revised and piloted Core Competency and Ability-Based assignments. This project considers the development of a best practice methodology to support understanding and incorporation of the Core Competencies and Abilities into the courses led by full-time and part-time faculty including dissemination and integration of previously constructed assignments, piloting of assignments, and examining student artifacts.

    In your application, please include a description of the focus area your year-long project, what you expect to accomplish, and an itemized budget with an explanation of how you plan to use the funds (up to $7500). Proposals are expected to provide clear timelines and specific activities for project development.



    • ELIGIBILITY

      Faculty representing departments or programs in Academic Affairs.



    • REQUIREMENTS

      Recipients of this mini- grant are expected to:
      Submit 2-4 revised assignments for the Assignment Library which are successfully accomplishing Core Competency and Ability learning.
      Provide an interim report in January 2017 and a final report in June 2017. Interim and final reports must include a narrative of project activities to date, goals achieved, challenges encountered, plans for next steps, and a budget update with itemized financial expenditures.
      Present the results of the mini- grant to the other participants and to the LAGCC community.
      Attend 6 mini-grant sessions.

    • SUPPORT

      To support programs’ work in these areas, the Center for Teaching and Learning is offering mini-grants of up to $7500 for the 2016-17 academic year.



    • DATES

      Fridays, 10:00 to 12:00
      2016 – June 17th, September 23nd, November 18th,
      2017 - January 20th, March 24rd, May 19th

    • INQUIRIES

      Regina Lehman ( rlehman@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5775);
      Justin Rogers-Cooper ( jrogers@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5913)
      Niesha Ziehmke (nziehmke@lagcc.cuny.edu, x6058)


    The application deadline for 2016-17 has passed. For information, contact Niesha Ziehmke ( nziehmke@lagcc.cuny.edu, x6058).




    3. Engagement & Dissemination Mini Grant: Implementation of Competency & Ability-Based Assignments

    For academic departments and programs that have successfully integrated the General Education Core Competencies and Abilities into their curriculum and revised key Competency and Abilities-Based assignments, the Center for Teaching and Learning is offering year-long mini-grant of up to $2500 to support the next step – broad implementation. These grants support the implementation of the revised and piloted Core Competency and Ability-Based assignments to full-time or part-time faculty. This project considers the development of a best practice methodology to support said implementation of the Core Competencies and Abilities into the courses led by full-time and part-time faculty.

    We invite you to apply, and look forward to receiving proposals. In your application, please include a description of your year-long project, what you expect to accomplish, and an itemized budget with an explanation of how you plan to use the funds (up to $2500). Proposals are expected to provide clear timelines and specific activities for project development.


    • ELIGIBILITY

      Faculty representing departments or programs in Academic Affairs.



    • REQUIREMENTS

      Recipients of this mini- grant are expected to:
      Provide an interim report in January 2017 and a final report in June 2017. Interim and final reports must include a narrative of project activities to date, goals achieved, challenges encountered, plans for next steps, and a budget update with itemized financial expenditures.
      Present the results of the mini- grant to the other participants and to the LAGCC community.
      Attend 3 mini-grant sessions.

    • SUPPORT

      To support programs’ work in these areas, the Center for Teaching and Learning is offering mini-grants of up to $2500 for the 2016-17 academic year.



    • DATES

      Wednesdays,, 3:30 - 5:30
      2016 – September 28th,
      2017 - February 22nd and May 24th

    • INQUIRIES

      Regina Lehman ( rlehman@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5775);
      Justin Rogers-Cooper ( jrogers@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5913)
      Niesha Ziehmke (nziehmke@lagcc.cuny.edu, x6058)


    The application deadline for 2016-17 has passed. For information, contact Niesha Ziehmke ( nziehmke@lagcc.cuny.edu, x6058).






    Liberal Arts Clusters have been shown to support student success, and with the recent introduction of LIF101, there are opportunities to enhance student advisement, retention, and graduation still further. In addition, the introduction of the “integration” core competency means the kinds of interdisciplinary teaching found in clusters and pairs are increasingly important. This seminar will provide a forum for faculty teaching in clusters and pairs to work with one another and with Student Services staff to enhance the integration and advisement within Learning Communities. As co-curriculars are an important component in the First Year Experience, this seminar will also support field trips.

    Faculty in the seminar will attend one full-day seminar prior to the start of the semester, attend at least two of the monthly learning community seminars, meet with their team each week, and write a short report at the end of the semester.


    • ELIGIBILITY

      Participants must be scheduled to teach a cluster or pair in Fall 2016, and at least two of the cluster team members must participate.


      The application deadline for 2016-17 has passed. For information, contact Naomi Stubbs ( nstubbs@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5680.)

    • SUPPORT

      $550 per faculty member, plus funds for field trips



    • DATES

      Friday, Sept. 2, 9:00 - 4:00
      Participants must attend two of the four monthly seminars (from 3:30-5pm) on
      Monday, Sept. 19
      Thursday, Oct. 6
      Monday, Nov. 7
      Thursday, Dec. 1
    • INQUIRIES

      Naomi Stubbs (nstubbs@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5680)






    In this year-long orientation to teaching and learning at LaGuardia, new full-time faculty work with CTL staff and senior colleagues to learn about their new professional environment. Participants learn from each other, and from colleagues across the College, about LaGuardia’s students, college-wide campus initiatives, opportunities, and pedagogical strategies proven to be effective at LaGuardia. The colloquium is a setting in which new faculty meet with colleagues and can form friendships that carry into future endeavors. Colloquium sessions and activities also include introductions to the key processes, resources, and information that will help new faculty successfully navigate their first year at the college and set the stage for a successful LaGuardia career.


    • ELIGIBILITY

      New faculty will be invited through their departments.


    • SUPPORT

      In recognition of effort, and contingent upon regular attendance and active participation, each faculty participant will receive a stipend of $250.


    • DATES

      Mondays from 3:30 – 5:30 pm unless specified
      Opening Institute: Wed. 9/7 from 9am - 4pm
      Fall 2016: 9/26, 10/17, 11/14, 12/5
      Mid-year Institute: Friday, 1/27/17 from 9am - 4pm
      Spring 2017: 3/13, 4/24, 5/15, 6/5

    • INQUIRIES

      Josephine Corso ( jcorso@lagcc.cuny.edu), x5416, or Priscilla Stadler (pstadler@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5489)






    For many LaGuardia students, getting into college is easier than staying and succeeding. As colleges nationwide focus on improving completion and graduation, the first year of college has emerged as a critical juncture for building student success. To meet this challenge, LaGuardia has launched a bold innovation designed to better help first-year students succeed. The initiative is well under way, and in Fall 2015 First-Year Seminar (FYS) courses were offered to approximately 85% of our entering class, including students declaring majors within Business and Technology, Health Sciences, and Natural Sciences, as well as both Liberal Arts programs (Humanities/Social Sciences and Math/Science), Criminal Justice, Psychology, and Engineering/Computer Science.

    The FYS links an introduction to the major with advisement and an orientation to college learning. Taught by discipline-based faculty and supported by advisement teams, the seminars utilize peer mentoring and the connective power of ePortfolio to advance student success in the first college year and beyond. The new courses introduce students to key skills and concepts of the appropriate discipline (e.g. “What does it mean to think like a scientist?”) and help them develop the habits of persistence, achievement, and self-efficacy needed for college success. FYS courses facilitate a productive transition to the college environment. The use of ePortfolio and support of advisors strengthen students’ abilities to reflect on their personal and professional choices, develop suitable educational plans, and reinforce self-direction.

    The combination of educationally effective practices embedded in the FYS is powerful. Data collected over the past five semesters demonstrates that it makes a significantly significant difference in building engagement in learning, retention, credit accumulation and progress towards the degree.

    The New to College Summer Intensive seminar will help faculty plan and implement the new FYS course for delivery in Fall 2016 and beyond. Teaching these courses will ask faculty to think creatively, use their expertise and develop new pedagogies. It will also provide an invaluable opportunity to engage with students in new ways.

    Participants in New to College will bring with them a strong understanding of the seminar’s underlying goal: to help entering students gain the knowledge, skills, and confidence they need to persist and successfully complete their programs of study. Participants should be open to learning how to approach the “whole student,” as the seminar will cultivate an integrative pedagogy addressing not only cognitive academic abilities, but also co-curricular experience and affective dimensions of learning. ePortfolio practice is a central element in the course design as well, and while participants need not have extensive ePortfolio experience, willingness to learn about integrative ePortfolio practice will be critical to success.

    New to College will support effective teaching, helping participants to
    • Better understand the goals, purpose, and philosophy of a holistic First Year Experience;
    • Refine the discipline-based First Year Seminar course plan and syllabus;
    • Explore the changing needs of LaGuardia students and the research on student success;
    • Design pedagogy for introducing new students to disciplinary forms of inquiry;
    • Provide students with a close-knit community that explores disciplinary thinking;
    • Develop their understanding of ePortfolio as an integrative pedagogy and practice;
    • Gain familiarity with advisement resources, including online tools that can be used in a hybrid structure.
    We invite your application to the New to College Summer Intensive seminar, and we look forward to your participation in this pioneering effort to build success for LaGuardia students.


    • ELIGIBILITY

      The application deadline for 2016-17 has passed. For information, contact Ellen Quish ( equish@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5382.)

      New to College Summer Intensive is open to full-time and experienced part-time faculty in the Departments of Business & Technology, Natural Sciences, Health Sciences, Mathematics, Engineering and Computer Science (MEC) and departments associated with these majors: Liberal Arts Humanities/ Social Sciences (English, Social Sciences, Humanities, Education & Language Acquisition), the Liberal Arts Math/Science (Natural Science and MEC), Criminal Justice, Psychology, and Engineering/Computer Science. Staff who regularly teach as part-time faculty in these departments are also eligible to apply.

      All faculty applying to take part in this program must agree to teach the FYS for two semesters and to work with their chairs to ensure that they get scheduled to teach the FYS in their area for Fall 2016. Faculty will only be accepted in the seminar if they are scheduled to teach the FYS in Fall 2016.



    • SUPPORT

      In recognition of the sustained and intensive nature of the New to College seminar, and contingent upon regular seminar attendance, active participation, and teaching the First-Year Seminar in Fall 2016, each faculty participant will receive three hours of released time to be used in 2016-17 (or alternatively, a stipend of $3,000).



    • DATES

      Summer Institute: 6/21, 6/22, 6/23, 6/24, 8/31, and 9/1 from 9 am-4 pm

      Meets on Fridays from 9-1pm on:

      Fall I:
      9/23, 11/4, 12/2
      Fall II: 2/3/17
      Spring 2017: 3/31, 5/19

    • INQUIRIES

      Ellen Quish (equish@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5382)







    Front-line staff are critical to every organization. At LaGuardia, they are often the first point of contact for both current and prospective students and are critically important for building stronger rates of retention and graduation. Recognizing the importance of this connection, and building on the STAR (Support Team for Advisement Relations) 2013 working group recommendation that front-line staff be provided with opportunities for networking and professional development, the Center for Teaching and Learning offers 3 annual half-day events that help staff from across the college learn about key initiatives and practice skills (such as conflict resolution, effective communication, and career planning) that help us manage ourselves, inform our daily work, and support students more effectively. These events also focus special attention on the LaGuardia Core Values (Learning, Diversity, Opportunity, Responsibility, and Innovation).

    • ELIGIBILITY

      All interested front-line staff are eligible.



    • SUPPORT




    • DATES

      June 1, 2016, December 7, 2016, and June 21, 2017. Additional workshops may be offered periodically.

    • INQUIRIES

      Josephine Corso ( jcorso@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5416); Marzena Bugaj ( jcorso@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5455);








  • 2015 - 2016



    This fall, LaGuardia will implement the Global Learning Competency across all college curricula. Faculty have mapped Global Learning into courses in every program, and a new rubric will soon be tested (and revised if necessary) against Global Learning artifacts deposited for assessment. LaGuardia defines Global Learning as “critical analysis of and an engagement with complex, interdependent global systems and legacies (such as natural, physical, social, cultural, economic, and political) and their implications for people’s lives and the earth’s sustainability.” What does this mean in your discipline? How effectively can the current rubric be used to assess our students' work in this area? How can you revise your current course assignments to meet the new competency? How does a global approach make use of the diversity in our classrooms? And how do we take fullest advantage of the global knowledge that students at “the world’s community college” already possess? This seminar will provide a forum for discussing these and other important questions related to the development of effective pedagogical approaches to the Global Learning Competency. Participants will create or revise assignments for use in targeted courses and for assessment deposit. Seminar sessions will include sharing and critiquing assignments while exploring a range of approaches to global learning drawn from multiple disciplines. Additional sessions will be devoted to grading, to effective use of rubrics, and to the integration of quantitative literacy into a globally-informed pedagogy. The seminar will be led by Professors Karen Miller (Social Sciences) and Christopher Schmidt (English), and Padmini Biswas (Manager of Global Affairs, CTL).


    • ELIGIBILITY

      This program is open to all full-time Academic Affairs and ACE faculty.  Adjuncts who can commit to attending all seminar meetings are also welcome to apply.



    • SUPPORT

      In recognition of her or his effort, and contingent upon attendance and active participation, each Academic Affairs faculty participant will receive a stipend of $1,250.



    • DATES

      [Meets on Mondays 2:15 - 4:15 unless otherwise noted]
      Opening Institute: Thursday June 11, 1:00 - 4:00
      Fall 2015 Mondays 2:15 - 4:15 : Sept. 21, Oct. 19, Nov.9, Nov. 30

    • INQUIRES

      Karen Miller ( kmiller@lagcc.cuny.edu, x6016)
      Christopher Schmidt ( cshmidt@lagcc.cuny.edu; x5904)
      Pasmini Biswas ( pbiswas@lagcc.cuny.edu, x7552)

    Click here to apply







    The scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) is generally defined as the rigorous and systematic study of student learning, publicly shared, open to peer review and critique, and committed to collective knowledge-building. The Carnegie Seminar commits itself to these principles and to LaGuardia’s vision of an integrated culture of evidence-based teaching and learning. The 2015-2016 participants will choose to investigate either the current trends, issues, and high impact practices related to students in transition to the first college year or to the challenges of underprepared readers. As the nation reflects on challenges facing our schools, the values and missions of community colleges are more visible and pivotal than ever in the educational and intellectual life of our country. LaGuardia’s Carnegie Seminar provides opportunities for scholarship to faculty who wish to contribute their voices to the nation’s conversations about the paths to increased student aspiration and success.

    The Carnegie Seminar offers participants the dedicated time, space, and critical feedback necessary to produce a paper suitable for publication. Seminar participants commit to contributing their findings to In Transit, LaGuardia’s in-house journal which serves as a staging ground for work to be further revised and submitted for external publication. Participants will:

    • Distinguish among good teaching, scholarly teaching and learning, and the scholarship of teaching and learning;
    • Explore theories, methods, and examples relevant to supporting first year students and first year seminars;
    • Gain familiarity with foundational pedagogical theories and practices relevant to the challenges and importance of motivating students to read diverse forms of texts;
    • Draft and revise a publishable paper on issues related to students in transition or students’ reading experiences and practices;
    • Commit to peer accountability; contribute to immediate and productive feedback on lines of scholarly inquiry;
    • Commit to attend all seminars and institutes (see seminar schedule below); and,
    • Contribute to a motivated, positive, and focused environment.
    Committed to LaGuardia’s culture of intentional teaching, the Carnegie Seminar is rooted in the Center for Teaching and Learning’s participation in the Integrative Learning Project directed by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and the Association of American Colleges & Universities (AAC&U). The Foundation has guided faculty across the country in scholarly inquiry into teaching and learning, in documenting their discoveries, and in contributing to new knowledge and more purposeful classroom practice. Click here to Learn More...

    The 2015-2016 Carnegie Seminar will be facilitated by Michele Piso, (CTL and Humanities), Jose Fabara, (English Language Acquisition) and Patricia Sokolski, (Humanities).


    • ELIGIBILITY

      The Carnegie Seminar is open to full-time faculty, CLTs, and long-term part-time faculty; Student Affairs colleagues are also welcome.



    • SUPPORT

      In recognition of her or his effort, and contingent upon attendance and active participation, each Academic Affairs faculty participant will receive a stipend of $1,250.



    • DATES

      [Meets on Thursdays, 3:30 - 5:30 unless otherwise noted]
      Orientation Institutes 2015: Friday, June 12, 9:30 – 12:30 and Thursday, September 10, 3:30 – 5:30
      Fall I 2015 Thursdays, 3:30 – 5:30: September 24; October 8 and 29; November 5 and 19, and December 3 and 17
      Mid-Year Institutes 2016, 10:00 – 4:00: Friday, January 22 and Friday, February 19
      Spring I 2016 Thursdays, 3:30 – 5:30: March 10 and 24, April 7 and 14, May 5 and 19, and June 16

    • INQUIRES

      Michele Piso ( mpiso@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5483)

    Click here to apply







    Academic programs that have recently completed their Periodic Program Reviews are now building the structures and processes designed to meet programmatic challenges identified through their PPR work, and explore new initiatives related to recommendations made during the PPR process. To support this “closing the loop” phase of the PPR study, data collection and analysis, and improvement cycle, the Center for Teaching and Learning is offering mini-grants of up to $7,500 for the 2015-16 academic year. Proposals can address a range of issues, including developing new courses, improving assessment methodologies, creating and developing new aspects of the program, working with College offices to improve recruitment and student retention, improving program-specific tutoring, etc.

    We invite you to apply, and look forward to receiving proposals. In your application, please include a description of what you expect to accomplish and the PPR recommendation your project addresses, as well as an itemized budget and explanation of how you plan to use the funds (up to $7500). Contact Ros Orgel (x5448; roslyno@lagcc.cuny.edu) if you have any questions about the budget, or if you want to explore ideas and possibilities for your program.


    • ELIGIBILITY

      Faculty representing programs in Academic Affairs that have recently completed Periodic Program Reviews.



    • SUPPORT

      To support programs’ work in these areas, the Center for Teaching and Learning is offering mini-grants of up to $7,500 for the 2015-16 academic year.



    • DATES

      To be arranged with participating programs. A brief interim progress report must be submitted in January 2016; in June 2016, programs awarded mini-grants will submit a brief report documenting goals achieved, challenges encountered, and next steps.

    • INQUIRES
      Ros Orgel ( roslyno@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5448)
      Howard Wach ( hwash@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5478)

    Click here to apply







    The place of ePortfolio at LaGuardia is changing and growing quickly. Thousands of our entering students are now using ePortfolio in First-Year Seminars, combining an introduction to their major with “College 101” skills, exploration of goals, and structured educational planning. Building on the FYS experience, academic programs are strengthening existing strategies, and building new ones, for longitudinal use of ePortfolios from the First-Year Seminar to the capstone course. And implementation of the Integrative Learning Core Competency and Digital Communication ability across curricula is highlighting ePortfolio’s capacity to connect diverse experiences and strengthen student-centered online learning.

    In the Connected Learning seminar, participants will actively explore key pedagogical concepts in the field, such as integrative learning, reflective practice, and learner-centered approaches to disciplinary knowledge. They will pursue both conceptual and practical goals while creating their own seminar and course-based ePortfolios and becoming adept users of the Digication platform. The seminar intentionally models a classroom environment in which principles of inquiry, reflection, and integration organize participants’ activities and instructional design. Participants learn about the varieties of ePortfolio practice at LaGuardia and at other colleges, and will spend the Fall 2015 semester preparing a pedagogical strategy for active delivery in Spring 2016. Specific areas of emphasis include using ePortfolio to overcome fragmentation of learning, to enable stronger student connections with faculty, peers, and external audiences, and to integrate diverse learning experiences inside and outside the classroom. The Connected Learning seminar prepares faculty to implement pedagogies with a proven record of raising students’ performance while strengthening their sense of self and purpose, both academic and personal.

    Connected Learning is open to faculty new to ePortfolio and to experienced practitioners who are already using ePortfolio successfully in their classes. This combination of experienced and new practitioners, of fresh perspective with practical expertise, will continue to spur the evolving ePortfolio practice at the college and guide students to new levels of learning and academic, professional, and personal growth. Specific goals for this seminar include:
    • Introducing faculty who are new to ePortfolio to its technology and pedagogy, building on best practices from the national field;
    • Connecting ePortfolio pedagogy to LaGuardia’s new Core Competencies, with special focus on Integrative Learning and Digital Communication;
    • Exploring new and proven approaches to reflective practice and social pedagogy;
    • Considering the place of ePortfolio within a larger ecosystem of contemporary online learning;
    • Creating/critiquing course syllabi, assignments, and projects;
    • Supporting and contributing to use of ePortfolio across academic programs; and,
    • Testing and documenting participants’ work in the seminar.



    • ELIGIBILITY

      Open to all full-time Academic Affairs and ACE faculty, as well as to long-term, part-time faculty and Student Affairs staff who are teaching classes. No previous ePortfolio experience is necessary, but applicants should possess a general proficiency with Web-based applications and a willingness to experiment with a new platform. Experienced ePortfolio practitioners who wish to continue the supported growth of their pedagogy - including those who have participated in previous ePortfolio-based seminars - are welcome to apply.



    • SUPPORT

      In recognition of her or his effort, and contingent upon attendance and active participation, each Academic Affairs faculty participant will receive a stipend of $1,250.



    • DATES

      [Meets on Fridays, 9:00-1:00 unless otherwise noted]
      Kickoff Institute - Friday June 12 (9:00 - 1:00) and Sept. 18 (9:00 - 4:00)
      Fall 2015 - Oct.16, Nov. 13, Dec. 11
      Mid-Year Institute - Thursday Feb. 4 and Friday Feb.5 from 9:00 - 4:00
      Spring 2016 - Mar.11, Apr. 15, May 13, June 10

    • INQUIRES
      Demetrios Kapetanakos ( dkapetenakos@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5670)
      Ellen Quish ( equish@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5382)
      Howard Wach ( hwash@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5478)

    Click here to apply







    Designing Information Assignments for Literacy (DIAL) is a one-semester intensive seminar which will pursue two goals: to contribute to a body of Open Education Resources (OER), and to help faculty design assignments addressing LaGuardia’s Inquiry and Problem Solving Competency while building students’ technology skills. DIAL participants from across the disciplines will incorporate research and information literacy skill-building into class assignments. Applying inquiry-based pedagogy to constructing assignments that utilize online databases, faculty will be able to design strategies for utilizing the Inquiry and Problem Solving core competency in their discipline. In addition, seminar participants will contribute to a publicly viewable Open Education Resource (OER) guide designed to help other faculty – at LaGuardia and beyond – integrate information literacy into their teaching through a problem-based approach to designing learning activities. At the heart of the OER resource guide will be the development of sample research projects for students that target information literacy as an outcome, along with faculty participants’ narratives explaining the rationale behind the assignments. This seminar will also provide faculty participants the opportunity to learn about Library resources and how to best integrate them into student research. Participants will implement the assignment they design during the Fall I 2015 semester. Participants will:
    1. Learn about research and information literacy and critical information literacy;
    2. Explore the principles behind OER;
    3. Build upon teaching and learning frameworks that advance student learning through well-designed curricula and lessons;
    4. Use inquiry-based learning as a pedagogical framework for developing effective, assessable assignments;
    5. Investigate the role of inquiry and problem-solving in research; and,
    6. Implement the assignment they design during the Fall I 2015 semester.



    • ELIGIBILITY

      This seminar is open to all full-time Academic Affairs and Adult and Continuing Education faculty, as well as to long-term, part-time faculty. The seminar will integrate iterative instructional design, peer critique, and readings from the field. Participants are required to implement the assignment they design during the Fall 1 2015 semester, concurrent with the seminar.



    • SUPPORT

      In recognition of her or his effort, and contingent upon attendance and active participation, each Academic Affairs faculty participant will receive a stipend of $500.



    • DATES

      [Meets on Fridays, 10:00 - 12:00 unless otherwise noted]
      Fall 2015 - Sept. 18 (9:00 - 12:00), Oct. 9, Nov. 20, Dec. 11

    • INQUIRES
      Alexandra Rojas ( arojas@lagcc.cuny.edu , x6020)
      Dianne Gordon Conyers ( dconyers@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5415)
      Priscilla Stadler ( pstadler@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5489)

    Click here to apply







    In an age of social media, digital connectedness, and rapidly changing expectations of work and personal interactions with technology, what is the role of the digital pedagogue? What role does technology play in our disciplines, in the classroom, in our curriculum, in our lives? How do faculty and students alike negotiate the powerful world of digital technology and learn what it means to live, teach, and work with a carefully considered digital identity?

    This seminar will focus on the philosophical, the pedagogical, and the personal. What does technology mean in our lives today? How are we all "Dancing with Robots" as we look towards the future? How does technology impact the classroom and curriculum? What are the best ways to seamlessly integrate technology as a complement to what we already do? Where do we need to make affordances for new technology? When is it okay to ignore or exclude technology in the classroom? How do our personal choices about technology outside of the classroom impact our pedagogical choices?

    This seminar will invite participants to engage in these questions both theoretically, through the lens of shared texts, and practically, through hands-on, how-to application of the principles we explore to the classroom environment. We will explore emerging models for scaffolding digital production with students, engaging in questions of how to publish, teach, and mentor in today's higher ed environment. Considering LaGuardia’s Core Competencies of Integrative Learning and Digital Communication as exciting, engaging points of entry for curriculum design, the seminar will give particular attention to creating a digital classroom with intention: not adding on bells and whistles for effect. Instead, what does a carefully and intentionally designed digital pedagogy look like? How does technology afford us new opportunities to think about scholarship and collaboration with students in new areas of open educational resources: scholarly, scientific, and creative? How might we use technology to leverage what happens in our classrooms to share with the outside world so that our knowledge serves everyone?


    • ELIGIBILITY

      This seminar is open to all full-time Academic Affairs and Adult and Continuing Education faculty, as well as to long-term, part-time faculty and Student Affairs staff who are teaching classes. Applicants need not have previous experience with specific online platforms, but should possess a general proficiency with Web-based applications and a willingness to experiment.



    • SUPPORT

      In recognition of her or his effort, and contingent upon attendance and active participation, each Academic Affairs faculty participant will receive a stipend of $1,250.



    • DATES

      [Meets on Monday afternoons from 3:30 - 5:30 unless noted]
      Opening Institute: Monday, June 15 (1:00 - 4:00)
      Fall 2015 - Sept.21, Oct. 26, Nov. 16, Dec. 7
      Mid-year Institute: Thursday Feb.18 (10:00 - 1:00)
      Spring 2016 - Mar.14, Apr. 18, May 16, June 6

    • INQUIRES
      Liz Clark ( lclark@lagcc.cuny.edu , x6020)
      Priscilla Stadler ( pstadler@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5489)

    Click here to apply







    The Faculty Scholars Publication Workshop is a year-long development seminar designed to assist LaGuardia faculty in publishing their scholarly writing projects. The Workshop seeks to help faculty scholars complete current academic writing projects and place them in external, peer-reviewed journals. It builds on the work undertaken in the Carnegie Seminar and In Transit: The LaGuardia Journal on Teaching and Learning, but is distinct in two key ways:
    1. Carnegie and In Transit focus particularly on the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL). The Workshop, however, encompasses both SoTL projects and traditional disciplinary scholarship. We understand a heterogeneous approach as a strength and a reflection of the College’s broad approach to faculty research and professional development.
    2. Second, while Carnegie participants frame a researchable question and design methodology, applicants to the Workshop should have a draft manuscript well underway. Focused on peer critique and exchange, the workshop process includes careful reading of manuscripts, discussion, and, very importantly, written comments. It also includes discussion about identifying publication venues and the submission process. Group facilitators are available for individual consultation.
    The Faculty Scholars Publication Workshop has evolved out of the Interdepartmental Faculty Scholarly Writing Group, an informal support group initiated by Nancy Berke and Ting Man Tsao in 2006-2007. This group was modeled on CUNY’s Faculty Fellowship Publication Program (FFPP). LaGuardia faculty scholars from various disciplines—ranging from Accounting to Humanities, from Mathematics to English, from Library to Cooperative Education—have come together to read, critique, and support one another’s writing within their respective fields. Participants have benefited from the support of the Carnegie Seminar, In Transit and the Faculty Workshop on Scholarship and Publication; they have revised and submitted work subsequently published in peer-reviewed journals.


    • ELIGIBILITY




    • SUPPORT




    • DATES

      [Meets on Tuesdays from 3:30 – 5:30 unless otherwise noted]
      Fall 2015: Sept. 22, Oct. 20, Nov. 17, Dec. 8
      Mid-year meeting to be determined
      Spring 2016: Mar.22, Apr. 19, May 17, June 7

    • INQUIRES
      Nancy Berke ( nberke@lagcc.cuny.edu , x5908)
      Michele Piso ( mpiso@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5483)

    Click here to apply







    To support LaGuardia’s model of team-based advisement organized by majors, the CTL offers Foundations of Advising, an intensive one-semester seminar which provides participants with the training, tools, and resources needed to help students plan their academic and professional futures. Offered as either the June 2015 Two-Day Intensive, or the Fall 2015 four-session seminar, led by a team of CTL staff, faculty, and Student Affairs professionals, provides practical and immediately applicable knowledge for faculty and staff engaged in advisement. Participants learn about LaGuardia’s team-based advisement model and practice the use of technologies and resources, including Degree Audit and the Advising Portal. Other seminar topics include registration and grading processes, course sequencing and selection, financial aid, educational planning, and conducting effective advisement conversations, or “advising as teaching.” Seminar resources include retrievable documentation designed to aid advisors, and seminar assignments include advisement activity with Degree Audit and face-to-face advisement practice with students. In addition to opportunities to practice advisement skills in a team context, participants are introduced to advisement processes in the First-Year Seminar, including ePortfolio-based academic planning. Foundations of Advising will help faculty and staff advisors navigate critical aspects of the LaGuardia student experience while providing hands-on opportunities to explore College advisement resources. Participants will gain a sound base of knowledge and skills needed to provide effective advisement.

    Participants in the seminar will:
    1. Gain a thorough understanding of LaGuardia advisement policies and procedures, and apply it to the advisement team relevant to the major in which they teach while building a supportive network of college personnel and resources to contact for assistance;
    2. Practice advising strategies to help students identify interests, skills, strengths, and areas needing improvement using effective advisement communication; and,
    3. Practice the application of advisement tools, information, and resources, such as Degree Audit and the ePortfolio’s educational planning modules, to assist students with educational, career, and transfer planning.



    • ELIGIBILITY

      Foundations of Advising is open to all LaGuardia faculty and staff in academic departments who advise students in any academic program with an advisement team. Student Affairs staff may participate with their supervisor’s permission.



    • SUPPORT

      In recognition of her or his effort, and contingent upon attendance and active participation, each Academic Affairs faculty participant will receive a stipend of $500.



    • DATES

      Dates for Two-Day June 2015 Intensive
      June 18 and 19, 9:00 - 4:00

      [Meets on Tuesdays, 2:30 - 5:30] Sept. 29, Oct. 20, Nov. 17, Dec. 8

    • INQUIRES
      Howard Wach ( hwach@lagcc.cuny.edu , x5478)
      Mercedes del Rosario ( mdelrosario@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5440)

    Click here to apply







    In a recent article, a Harvard Business School dean apologized to the women at Harvard because they could feel “disrespected, left out, and unloved by the school.” Dean Nitin Nohria voiced concerns that have long been in the minds of educators: How do we become more inclusive in our classrooms? At LaGuardia, the most recent Middle States self-study recommended a stronger institutional emphasis on “values, ethics, and diversity.” Responding to these concerns, the college has instituted the Global Learning Competency. The Gender and Diversity at LaGuardia Seminar will cultivate pedagogical approaches to classroom diversity while building faculty capacity to apply such approaches to Global Learning. Through a review of literature written by those who have been mis- or underrepresented, we will explore the use of feminist and decentering pedagogical techniques to foster a more student-centered learning environment. These techniques, such as Collaborative Learning, democratic classrooms (in which students co-design rules of behavior and grading criteria), or Problem-Based Learning, encourage a classroom atmosphere which empowers marginalized actors to feel comfortable and equal. These pedagogies can create more inclusive classrooms and turn the focus of education toward shared responsibility between students and faculty (now turned into facilitators).

    The seminar will feature readings, discussions, and activities designed to build greater sensitivity toward LaGuardia’s incredibly diverse population. We will engage a broad range of primary sources and apply them to the diversity of the seminar itself (e.g., people of richly diverse backgrounds teaching in many disciplines). Seminar materials will include multidisciplinary and multimodal forms of expression (for example, movies and graphic novels). Each session will model feminist and/or decentering pedagogical techniques to analyze seminar readings and to apply their insights to our classroom strategies.

    The use and practice of these techniques will create opportunities to make classes more inclusive for LaGuardia students and to explore aspects of Global Learning. Discovering how diversity and inclusiveness can be built into the courses we teach will strengthen their impact on the “whole student”-- the student who belongs to a heterogeneous universe that includes family, work, school, past experiences and future expectations, and create opportunities for learning which are integrative as well as inclusive. Gender and Diversity at LaGuardia welcomes all faculty who are interested in developing strategies for increasing awareness and practice of diversity in the classroom. The seminar will be a cross-disciplinary community and forum for dialogue, investigation, and support. Participants will:
    1. Be exposed to pedagogical techniques that aim to increase student centered, inquiry-based learning. Participants will become familiar with techniques such as Problem Based Learning (PBL), Collaborative Learning (CL), and Project Oriented Learning (POL), and will be expected to incorporate one of these techniques into the activity they design during the seminar;
    2. Create strategies they can use in their classes to strengthen students’ integration of curricular and co-curricular experiences. Drawing from these experiences will turn the classroom into a more respectful, diverse, and cosmopolitan place of learning;
    3. Through the lens of seminar readings, discussions, and collaborative sharing and exploration of pedagogical experience, examine and revise their own orientation to diversity and gender expectations/performance, and inclusion of difference in the classroom;
    4. Explore LaGuardia’s Core Competencies and their application, with special attention to the Global Learning Competency;
    5. Develop an activity that they can use in their classes that clearly addresses issues of diversity, ethics, and inclusion. They will write this activity in three stages: 1) instructional design and assessment; 2) application of the activity during the Spring semester; 3) revision of the activity and reflection on both how the expectations were fulfilled and on any new learning that happened through the activity;
    6. Use the seminar as a space to reflect on their own pedagogical practice and their preparedness to teach in a diverse community such as LaGuardia; and,
    7. Keep a journal in which they will write down useful ideas they have encountered in the seminar and ways in which these ideas can find a way into their classrooms.



    • ELIGIBILITY

      Open to all Academic Affairs and Adult and Continuing Education faculty.



    • SUPPORT

      In recognition of her or his effort, and contingent upon attendance and active participation, each Academic Affairs faculty participant will receive a stipend of $1,250.



    • DATES

      [Meets on Tuesdays, 2:30 - 4:30]
      Fall 2015 - Sept. 22, Oct. 6, Oct. 20, Nov. 3, Nov. 17, Dec.1
      Winter 2016 - Feb. 16
      Spring 2016 - Mar. 22, Apr. 12, Apr. 19, May 10, May 17

    • INQUIRES
      Claudia Moreno Parsons ( cmorenopisano@lagcc.cuny.edu , x5909)
      Dahlia Elsayed ( delsayed@lagcc.cuny.edu, x4074)
      Ros Orgel ( roslyno@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5448)

    Click here to apply







    The online lives of students continually evolve alongside the Internet’s constantly growing role in culture and society. Hybrid or “blended” courses connect instructors and students alike to the rich possibilities of web-centered learning while offering scheduling flexibility to students with very busy lives. We know that online learning is most effective when course design and pedagogical methods are built around widely accepted good practices. The most fundamental of these is to ensure that clear academic objectives drive course development and pedagogical strategy as well as decisions about technology applications. Other good practices include the provision of social, cognitive, and teaching “presence” and the creation of a class-based community of inquiry. For hybrid courses, a clear plan for dividing work between online environments and the classroom is also of critical importance.

    To strengthen the process of building high-quality hybrid courses at LaGuardia, and to provide resources for faculty to further develop their practice collaboratively, the Center for Teaching and Learning will offer mini-grants of up to $7,500 for the 2015-2016 academic year. Grants will be awarded to faculty teams pursuing program-based or departmentally-based projects and may be used to support developing new hybrid courses or refining and improving existing courses. Funding priorities include:
    • Building effective peer review and course design strategies;
    • Demonstrated plan for sustainability beyond the grant period; and,
    • TWhere applicable, utilizing the online environment to integrate selected Core Competencies/Abilities into targeted courses.
    Housing these projects within departments or programs will enable a team of colleagues to work together on development, review, and revision of commonly-understood course content and commonly-determined goals and outcomes. The mini-grant program will be guided by CTL staff and include six meetings of all participating groups throughout the academic year. The purpose of these meetings will be to collectively review overall project goals, share project results and successes, and to brainstorm challenges.

    Project proposals should include identification of courses or course sections targeted for new development or redesign and the personnel who will contribute to the project. Projects will be evaluated according to the following criteria:
    1. Project Goals and Impact: Identify overall goals, including number of participants and number of courses or course sections affected. What is the project intended to accomplish, and how extensive will its impact be? Projects should plan to develop or redesign curricula that will be implemented in a minimum of 5 course sections in Spring 2016.
    2. Project Outcomes and Sustainability: Identify specific project results. How will these results be evaluated? How will the project’s work be sustained beyond the grant period?
    3. Calendar and Benchmarks: When, and in what order, will project goals be met?
    4. Itemized Budget Narrative: How do you propose to spend the requested funds?
    We invite you to apply, and look forward to receiving proposals.


    • ELIGIBILITY

      Faculty teams representing programs or departments in Academic Affairs.



    • SUPPORT

      To support programs’ work in these areas, the Center for Teaching and Learning is offering mini-grants of up to $7,500 for the 2015-16 academic year.



    • DATES

      [Meets on Fridays from 9 - 1 unless noted]
      Fall 2015: Oct.2, Nov.20
      Mid-year Institute: Jan.29 (9 - 4)
      Spring 2016: Apr.8, June 3

    • INQUIRES
      Nicole Maguire ( nhernandh@lagcc.cuny.edu , x6012)
      Josephine Corso ( hwach@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5416)
      Howard Wach ( roslyno@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5478)

    Click here to apply







    To expand the pool of faculty prepared to teach the First Year Seminar (FYS) in Fall 2015 and beyond, and to provide the opportunity for in-depth professional learning, the Center for Teaching and Learning will offer a Summer Intensive version of the New to College professional development seminar. This released-time supported seminar schedule includes full-day sessions on:

    June 22, 23, 24, 25 and September 1, 2

    In addition, participants will attend three half-day meetings in the Fall semester on October 1, October 30, and December 4, and three additional meetings during the Fall II/Spring I semesters.

    Note: All faculty applying to take part in this program must work with their chairs as quickly as possible to ensure that they get scheduled to teach the FYS in their area for Fall 2015. The deadline to apply for this seminar is Thursday, April 2 at 5:00 pm. Faculty taking part in this program are expected to work with chairs to consider ways to include FYS as one element in the mix of their teaching schedules in future semesters.

    For many LaGuardia students, getting into college is easier than staying and succeeding. As colleges nationwide focus on improving completion and graduation, the first year of college has emerged as a critical juncture for building student success. To meet this challenge, LaGuardia has launched a bold innovation designed to better help first-year students succeed. The initiative is well under way, and for Fall 2015 we will offer First Year Seminar courses to approximately 85% of our entering class, including students declaring majors within Business and Technology, Health Sciences, and Natural Sciences, as well as both Liberal Arts programs (Humanities/Social Sciences and Math/Science), Criminal Justice, Psychology, and Engineering/Computer Science.

    Facilitating a productive transition to the college environment, the FYS links an introduction to the major with advisement and an orientation to college learning. Seminar students explore key skills and concepts of the appropriate discipline (e.g. ”What does it mean to think like a scientist?”), and practice the habits of persistence, achievement, and self-efficacy needed for college success. Taught by discipline-based faculty and supported by advisement teams, the seminars utilize peer mentoring and the connective power of ePortfolio to advance student achievement in the first college year and beyond. The consistent use of ePortfolio and support of advisors reinforce students’ abilities to reflect on their personal and professional options, choose suitable educational plans, and strengthen self-direction.

    New to College, Summer 2015 and Beyond: Re-Inventing the First Year Seminar will help faculty plan and implement the new FYS course for delivery in Fall 2015 and beyond. To teach these courses effectively, faculty must think creatively, use their expertise and expand their pedagogical repertoire. The experience will provide an invaluable opportunity to engage with students in new ways. Participants in New to College will bring with them a strong understanding of the seminar’s underlying goal: to help entering students gain the knowledge, skills, and confidence they need to persist and successfully complete their programs of study. Participants should be open to learning how to approach the “whole student,” as the seminar will cultivate an integrative pedagogy addressing not only cognitive academic abilities, but also co-curricular experience and affective dimensions of learning. While participants need not have ePortfolio experience, willingness to learn about integrative ePortfolio pedagogy will be critical to success.

    New to College will support effective teaching, helping participants to:
    • Better understand the goals, purpose, and philosophy of a holistic First Year Experience;
    • Refine the discipline-based First Year Seminar course plan and syllabus;
    • Explore the changing needs of LaGuardia students and the research on student success;
    • Design pedagogy for introducing new students to disciplinary forms of inquiry;
    • Provide students with a close-knit community that explores disciplinary thinking;
    • Develop understanding of ePortfolio as an integrative pedagogy and practice; and,
    • Gain familiarity with advisement resources, including online tools that can be used in a hybrid structure.
    In addition to supporting the design and implementation of the First Year Seminar, faculty participants will be invited to cultivate habits of pedagogical research and consider future possibilities for examining and publishing scholarly articles on LaGuardia’s transformed first year experience.

    We invite your application to the New to College, Summer 2015 and Beyond: Re-Inventing the First Year Seminar, and we look forward to your participation in this pioneering effort to build success for LaGuardia students.


    • ELIGIBILITY

      For Spring-Fall 2015, New to College is open to full-time and experienced part-time faculty who teach in the following programs: from Criminal Justice (Social Science Dept.), Engineering & Computer Science (MEC Dept.), Psychology (Social Science Dept), and Liberal Arts Math & Science (MEC and Natural Science Depts). Applicants must receive consent to participate from their department chairperson.



    • SUPPORT

      In recognition of effort, and contingent upon regular attendance and active participation, each faculty participant will receive a stipend of $1,500.



    • DATES

      Friday mornings, 9:00am -1:00 pm, unless otherwise noted: March 6, April 17, May 8, June 12, (9am – 4pm), on September 11, September 25, October 16, November 6, December 4, and two additional meetings-one in Fall II, February 5, and April 8.

    • INQUIRES
      Ellen Quish ( equish@lagcc.cuny.edu , x5382)
      Michele Piso ( mpiso@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5483)

    NOTE: Applications for the New to College Seminar were due in April, 2015.

    Click here to apply







    The LaGuardia Center for Teaching & Learning invites faculty from Criminal Justice (SocialScience Dept.), Engineering & Computer Science (MEC Department), Psychology (SocialScience Department), and Liberal Arts Math & Science (MEC and Natural Science Departments)to join a bold effort to help first year students succeed at LaGuardia.

    This year-long seminar will help faculty prepare to teach new First Year Seminar (FYS) coursesin the Fall 15 and Spring 16 semesters. The FYS is designed to better support students in theirfirst year of college, a critical juncture for building student success. Anchored in the commitmentto improve student persistence, achievement, and self-efficacy, the new FYS will facilitate aproductive transition to the college environment. The course is now required in Natural Sciences,Health Sciences, Business & Technology, Liberal Arts A.A. and has enrolled approximately2,600 students since Spring 2014. The programs named above are finalizing course proposalsthat will go to governance and, if approved, launch in Fall 2015.

    In the FYS, discipline-based faculty partner with peer mentors to provide students with an introduction to the major, combined with advisement and an orientation to college learning. Students are introduced to key skills and concepts of the appropriate discipline (e.g. “What does it mean to think like a scientist?”), and encouraged to develop the habits needed for college success. The integration of ePortfolio practice and advisement team support both aim to strengthen students’ enduring capacities to reflect on their personal and professional choices, develop and pursue evolving educational plans, and build the skills of self-authorship.

    Faculty who teach the FYS seminar should be committed to helping entering students gain the knowledge, skills, and confidence they need to persist and successfully complete their programs of study. Faculty will need to think creatively and use their expertise to develop new pedagogies responsive to the “whole student,” addressing not only cognitive academic abilities, but also cocurricular experience and affective dimensions of learning. Draft course proposals show ePortfolio as a common element in the course design; and while participants need not have extensive ePortfolio experience, a basic understanding of ePortfolio will be helpful.

    Faculty who participate in the New to College Seminar will:
    • Better understand the goals, purpose, and philosophy of a holistic First Year Experience;
    • Refine the discipline-based First Year Seminar course plan and syllabus;
    • Explore the changing needs of LaGuardia students and the research on student success;
    • Design pedagogy for introducing new students to disciplinary forms of inquiry;
    • Provide students with a close-knit community that explores disciplinary thinking;
    • Develop understanding of ePortfolio as an integrative pedagogy and practice; and,
    • Gain familiarity with advisement resources, including online tools that can be used in a hybrid structure.
    In addition to supporting the design and implementation of the First Year Seminar, faculty participants will be invited to cultivate habits of pedagogical research and consider future possibilities for examining and publishing scholarly articles on LaGuardia’s transformed First Year Experience.

    We invite your application to the New to College seminar, and we look forward to your participation in this pioneering effort to build success for LaGuardia students.

    Participants are expected to teach the First Year Seminar in Fall 2015 and Spring 2016.


    • ELIGIBILITY

      For Spring-Fall 2015, New to College is open to full-time and experienced part-time faculty who teach in the following programs: from Criminal Justice (Social Science Dept.), Engineering & Computer Science (MEC Dept.), Psychology (Social Science Dept), and Liberal Arts Math & Science (MEC and Natural Science Depts). Applicants must receive consent to participate from their department chairperson. Applications to this seminar were due on: January 19, 2015.



    • SUPPORT

      In recognition of effort, and contingent upon regular attendance and active participation, each faculty participant will receive a stipend of $1,500.



    • DATES

      Friday mornings, 9:00am -1:00 pm, unless otherwise noted: March 6, April 17, May 8, June 12, (9am – 4pm), on September 11, September 25, October 16, November 6, December 4, February 5, and April 8.

    • INQUIRES
      Ellen Quish ( equish@lagcc.cuny.edu , x5382)
      Michele Piso ( mpiso@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5483)

    Click here to apply







    New York is a global city - a site of global commerce, politics, culture and art; Queens is the most ethnically diverse urban area in the world. LaGuardia Community College is a microcosm of these socio-economic and historical trends. How do we teach our Urban Studies courses given this dynamic transnational backdrop? What makes course content “urban?” How can we revise and create assignments that will address the College’s Global Learning Competency? What can we do, across the college, to help students connect knowledge of the city with disciplinary skills and understanding?

    This seminar offers Urban Studies faculty an opportunity to consider these questions as they rethink and redesign their Urban Studies courses. In dialogue with other professors, and from a cross-disciplinary perspective, faculty will investigate ways to use New York City as a teaching and learning lab. The seminar will give faculty an opportunity to share Urban Studies related readings, experiential curriculum innovations, and to workshop assignments.


    • ELIGIBILITY

      Open to all faculty teaching or preparing to teach Urban Studies courses



    • SUPPORT

      In recognition of effort, and contingent upon regular attendance and active participation, each faculty participant will receive a stipend of $1,250.



    • DATES

      [Meets on Thursdays 2:30 - 4:30 unless otherwise noted]
      Fall 2015: Sept.17, Oct.8, Oct.29, Nov.12, Dec.3
      Mid-year Field Trip date and time to be determined
      Spring 2016: Mar.17, Mar.31, Apr.14, May 5, May 26

    • INQUIRES
      Arianna Martinez ( amartinez@lagcc.cuny.edu , x5961)
      Ros Orgel ( roslyno@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5448)

    Click here to apply







    Few contemporary issues are more important, or more relevant to higher education, than the relationship between digital technologies and personal identity. Funded by a two-year grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the seminar will bring together Liberal Arts faculty teaching clusters and/or capstones with a view to developing their curricula in conversation with one another and in relation to readings and visiting speakers addressing these topics.

    The 2015-16 seminar, co-led by Richard Brown (Humanities) and Naomi Stubbs (English) will focus on how definitions of “human” have been challenged by technological advancements. The focus will be on techno-humanism, trans-humanism, and on the biomedical ethical issues that derive from biological “enhancements” and reproductive choices. Braden Allenby, author of the Techno-Human Condition (2011), and Michio Kaku, author of The Future of the Mind (2014) will be our visiting speakers.


    • ELIGIBILITY

      This seminar is open to full and part-time faculty members in the Liberal Arts. You should be planning to teach a cluster and/or section of LIB200 in the Spring of the seminar year to which you apply.



    • SUPPORT

      In recognition of her or his effort, and contingent upon attendance and active participation, each Academic Affairs faculty participant will receive a stipend of $1,000.



    • DATES

      [Meets on Thursdays 3:30-5:30pmunless otherwise stated.]
      Opening Institute 2015: Friday June 19 (11:30 - 2:00)
      Fall 2015: Sept 24, Oct 15, Nov 13 (visiting speaker, Friday, 10-1), Dec 10
      Mid-year Institute: Feb. 19 (10 - 2)
      Spring 2016: Mar 17, Apr 15 (visiting speaker, Friday, 10-1), May 19, June 9

    • INQUIRES
      Naomi Stubbs ( nstubbs@lagcc.cuny.edu, x5680)

    Click here to apply







    The Writing in the Disciplines program at LaGuardia is part of a nation-wide, interdisciplinary effort that explores strategies for improving student writing and using writing as an active learning tool. A semester-long faculty development seminar, WID helps full- and part-time faculty develop and test writing-intensive assignments. Participants create and/or revise syllabi to meet the requirements for Writing Intensive courses, and post their work in a WID ePortfolio. Faculty who complete the seminar and ePortfolio will be certified to teach Writing Intensive courses such as Urban Studies and Capstone courses.

    The 2015-2016 WID program will offer two separate semester-long seminars. Professors Michelle Pacht and Evelyn Burg (English) will lead the Fall 2015seminar. Writing Fellows will help to conduct these seminars, working to support faculty as they create and revise assignments and syllabi. Additionally, participants will contribute their thoughts and work to four online discussions/blogs. The Spring 2016 seminar, conducted by the Writing Fellows, will be open to full- and part-time faculty. Meetings will take place on Mondays from 3:30 - 5:30, spring dates are to be determined.


    • ELIGIBILITY

      Full and part-time faculty who wish to teach Writing Intensive courses, including Capstone and/or Urban Studies courses, are required to complete WID. The WID program is also open to all vocational/technical faculty (CIS, AMS, or Allied Health) and faculty teaching any course required for completion of a vocational degree.



    • SUPPORT

      In recognition of her or his effort, and contingent upon attendance, active participation, and submission of the Writing Intensive ePortfolio, each Academic Affairs faculty participant will receive a stipend of $500.



    • DATES

      [Meets on Mondays, 3:30 - 5:30]
      Fall 2015: Sept. 21, Oct. 5, Oct. 19, Nov. 2, Nov. 16, Dec. 7
      Spring 2016 dates to be determined

    • INQUIRES
      Evelyn Burg ( burgev@lagcc.cuny.edu x5634)
      Michelle Pacht ( mpacht@lagcc.cuny.edu x5914)
      Ros Orgel ( roslyno@lagcc.cuny.edu x5448).

    Click here to apply







    Seminars and Programs Not Currently Accepting Applications



    In this year-long orientation to teaching and learning at LaGuardia, new full-time faculty work with CTL staff and senior colleagues to begin to adjust to their new educational setting. Participants learn from each other and from senior colleagues about LaGuardia students, the various pedagogies found to be effective at LaGuardia, and the college-wide initiatives and opportunities that will inform their working lives. The colloquium is a setting in which new faculty meet colleagues and form friendships, while learning about strategies for future growth and building a successful career at LaGuardia.


    • ELIGIBILITY




    • SUPPORT




    • DATES

      [Meetings are on Mondays from 3:30 - 5:30 pm unless specified]
      Opening Institute: Friday, Sept. 11, 9:00 - 4:00
      Fall 2015: Sept. 28, Oct. 19, Nov. 16, Dec. 14
      Mid-Year Institute: Feb 5, 9:00 - 4:00
      Spring 2016: Mar.21, Apr. 18, May 9, June 6

    • INQUIRES

      Josephine Corso ( jcorso@lagcc.cuny.edu)
      Priscilla Stadler ( pstadler@lagcc.cuny.edu)

    Click here to apply







    MAT 119 is a new course, designed for non-STEM majors who need MAT096 and whose major requires them to take Elementary Statistics (MAT120). MAT 119 is based on the nationally recognized Statway curriculum, developed by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. Statway has been proven to work on campuses nationwide, and LaGuardia is an active participant in the national network. Faculty interested in teaching MAT 119 have been invited to participate in a year-long professional development seminar led by Drs. Prabha Betne, Milena Cuellar, and Marina Nechayeva, and Ros Orgel from the Center for Teaching and Learning. The seminar will help faculty prepare to teach MAT 119.


    • ELIGIBILITY




    • SUPPORT




    • DATES

      [Meetings are on Mondays from 3:30 - 5:30 pm unless specified]
      Opening Institute: Friday, Sept. 11, 9:00 - 4:00
      Fall 2015: Sept. 28, Oct. 19, Nov. 16, Dec. 14
      Mid-Year Institute: Feb 5, 9:00 - 4:00 Jan. 29
      Spring 2016: Mar.21, Apr. 18, May 9, June 6

    • INQUIRES
      Josephine Corso ( jcorso@lagcc.cuny.edu)
      Priscilla Stadler ( pstadler@lagcc.cuny.edu)

    Click here to apply