• Concurrent Workshops I

    11:10 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

    *Please see descriptions of the workshops below the tables*

    Room

    E-225
    E-227
    E-229
    E-234
    E-258
    E-260
    E-262
    E-264
    E-265
    E-266

    Workshop

    From Diversity to Inclusion: Staff and Faculty Share Experiences and Best Practices – I
    Linking Criminal Justice Theory to Experience
    Designing for All (D4A): A Student-Faculty-Staff Collaboration
    The Finance Club: Practical Applications of Theory Through a Co-Curricular Activity

    Learning from Queensbridge: The Gardiner-Shenker Scholars Program as an Example of Experiential Learning
    The American Museum of Natural History as a Conduit to Bring “Alive” the Concepts and Theories in Vertebrate Evolution

    Your neighborhood, your water: understanding the power of scientific knowledge and discovery to bring about change
    Alchemical Reactions: Transforming Humanities and STEM Curricula with Experiential Learning Opportunities
    Student Voices on College Textbooks
    Incorporating Experiential Learning and Digital Badging In STEM
    Understanding and Addressing Student Behavior
    The ePortfolio Resource Guide for Faculty

    The Core ePortfolio: a “Guided Pathways” Approach to Student Success

    Presenters

    Jason Hendrickson, Vanessa Bing, Renee Butler, Florence Kabba, Wendy Nicholson, Neetu Kaushik, Diane Gordon-Conyers
    Charlene Bryant and Cory Feldman
    Priscilla Stadler and the Designing-for-All Team
    Andrea Francis and Santo Trapani


    Steve Lang, Arianna Martinez and Filip Stabrowski
    Howard K. Motoike and David Kizirian


    Maria Entezari and Lucia Fuentes
    Clara Chen, Esther Rosa, Midas Tsai, and James Wilson
    Christopher McHale, Ian McDermott, Steven Ovadia, Elizabeth Arestyl, Sukhrob Abdushukurov, Teqwona Roberts, and Salih Mansur
    Ian Alberts, Olga Calderon, Cristina Di Meo, Charles Keller, Praveenkumar Khethavath, Elaine Lendebol, Holly Porter-Morgan, and Ingrid Veras.
    Nireata Seals and Luis Merchant
    Michele De Goeas-malone, et al.

    Pablo Avila, R. Bhika, C. Chan, E. Hofmann


    Concurrent Workshops II

    12:10 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.

    Room

    E-225
    E-227
    E-229
    E-234
    E-258
    E-260
    E-262
    E-264
    E-265
    E-266

    Workshop

    From Diversity to Inclusion: Students Share Experiences and Best Practices – II
    What is Global Citizenship Education? An Inter-Disciplinary Approach
    Voluntourism: Bringing industry practice into the classroom to engage students with their global community

    This is What Democracy Looks Like: Organizing for Civic Engagement on Our Diverse & International Campus
    Connecting Linguistic Theory to Students’ Language Experiences with a Global Learning Assignment
    Do math and economics help each other?
    Strengthening the College Community Through Service-Learning: Theatre Students Collaborate in Creation of Wellness Center Training Film
    Transfer Reconsidered
    Engaging Students in a Career Readiness Journey: Using Digital Badging to Connect Career Readiness across the Campus
    Pracademics: Spanning the Practitioner/Academic Divide
    The Student Experiences Research Group in Action: Creating Meaningful Activities While Learning and Developing

    Presenters

    Jason Hendrickson, Vanessa Bing, Hugo Fernandez, Tuli Chatterji, Toni Foy, and Student Volunteers
    Tuli Chatterji, Nicolle Fernandes, Maria Entezari, John Chaney
    Leslie G. Scamacca


    Rosemary Talmadge, Nichole Shippen, Chelsea Del Rio
    Leigh Garrison-Fletcher, Bede McCormack, et al.
    Tao Chen, Glenn Henshaw, Choon Shan Lai, and Soloman Kone
    Garrett Neergaard, Matthew Joffe, and Frank LaTerra-Bellino
    Renee Freeman-Butler, Jose Plasencia, Maria Ribas, Donniece Davis-Cooper, Luis Restrepo, Jian Fang, and Venice Hughes
    Ramon De Los Santos, Jessica Perez, Karen Gonzalez
    Jennifer Arroyo, Jacqueline Brashears, Catherine Colangelo, Milena Cuellar, Maureen Drennan, Cory Feldman, Kahdeidra Martin, Dionne Miller, and Michele Piso Manoukian
    Lara Beaty and the Studen Experiences Research Group

    Workshops Descriptions



    Room E-225

    Presenter(s): Jason Hendrickson, Vanessa Bing, Renee Butler, Florence Kabba, Wendy Nicholson, Neetu Kaushik, Diane Gordon Conyers, Hugo Fernandez, Tuli Chatterji, Toni Foy, Student Volunteers

    This session is a roundtable that seeks to answer the question, what does “inclusion” (as opposed to “diversity”) look like when practiced by LaGuardia’s staff and faculty? Borrowing from the broader theme of Opening Sessions, how do we go from diversity in theory to inclusion in practice in the work that we do? What are proven, effective strategies that we can share to improve the experiences between colleagues, as well as the experiences of the students we serve?

    To address this, faculty and staff participants will share successes and challenges they have experienced with regard to inclusion, as well as opportunities they see in their respective positions on campus to effect change. Participants also seek to preview and promote FSOC’s upcoming efforts to collect data and coordinate events around inclusion over the course of the academic year.


    Room E-227

    Presenter(s): Charlene Bryant and Cory Feldman

    How do we connect criminal justice students to meaningful careers, especially during times of turmoil? Two professors from the Social Science Department discuss projects that take students out of the classroom and into the field.

    The Latinx Justice Project addresses “Crimmigration” head-on by entering the facilities and agencies that work directly with the people impacted by immigration laws. Uniting multilingual students who are interested in working in Spanish on immigration justice, these students build professional pathways from LaGuardia to the field of immigration justice. The project employs two Federal Work Study students and volunteers in a local jail.

    In the Criminal Justice Professional Association, students volunteer their Fridays visiting courts and learning about internships, educational, and professional opportunities while building a community on campus of like-minded, self-motivated students.

    This panel will share how these initiatives have provided fellow students and faculty with the opportunity to travel from campus to courts, jails, high schools, and foster care agencies across New York City. Panelists discuss challenges and strategies for organizing, accessing campus resources and growing their collective vision into a student club or academic research project. The audience is any faculty or staff interested in working with students on issues of immigration, human or social justice.


    Room E-229

    Presenter(s): The Designing for All Team

    Designing for All (D4A) provided a rare collaboration: students, faculty and staff working together on a common project. Our goals were to ensure that all LaGuardia students can fully access their learning materials and feel welcomed in the LaGuardia learning environment.

    This year-long pilot supported by CUNY and LaGuardia’s CTL, D4A made inroads into these goals through: student and faculty research projects related to accessibility and inclusive learning design; multi-disciplinary faculty developing or revising their syllabi and learning activities to include all their students; offering “Make it Accessible” and Universal Design workshops for faculty and student technology mentors (who can then help more faculty learn these techniques); and, the developing and implementing a survey (designed by the D4A students with support from the D4A team) so that more than 700 LaGuardia students could tell us directly about the challenges and obstacles they face coming to campus, attending class, and participating in class.


    Room E-234

    Presenter(s): Andrea Francis and Santo Trapani

    The objective of this presentation is to provide a case study for faculty and staff on how a co-curricular activity, in this case the Finance Club, can effectively link theory with experience. The presenters will discuss how they have integrated a stock simulator, partnerships with financial institutions, mentorship, and student internships to provide club members with unique and dynamic opportunities to apply and reinforce their theoretical knowledge of finance, accounting, and economics. The presentation will also include time for presenters and attendees to discuss the ways in which the lessons and activities of the Finance Club can be modified for diverse classroom and/or co-curricular settings.


    Room E-234

    Presenter(s): Steve Lang, Arianna Martinez and Filip Stabrowski

    We will discuss the Voices of Queensbridge oral history project which grew out of the Gardiner-Shenker Research program sponsored by the LaGuardia Archives. In this one-year project, three Social Science faculty members working closely with LaGuardia students, explored the history of public housing by using Queensbridge Houses and the Jacob Riis center program for seniors as a case to learn about the past and present of New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) through the eyes of long term residents. The project linked theoretical understanding with hands on experiential knowledge. Along with learning how to critically evaluate, analyze and interpret scholarly writings and archival materials that addressed the history, economics, politics and social aspects of public housing, students also learned about oral history research and how to conduct interviews.


    Room E-258

    Presenter(s): Howard K. Motoike and David Kizirian

    Vertebrate Evolution (SCB-165) was first offered in the Fall 2013 semester as one of the new three credit Natural Science Pathways courses without a formal laboratory. Students are required to research topics for an oral presentation and a research paper based on their visit to the American Museum of Natural History located in Manhattan. The fourth floor is exclusively dedicated to the evolution of vertebrates and presented from a cladistic point of view. The objective for its inclusion into the curriculum was to provide the students an authentic display of evolutionary significant vertebrate species in a world class facility to bring “alive” the theories and concepts presented in the classroom. Another major goal of the assignment was to encourage students to visit the museum many of whom have lived in the New York Area their entire lives and never had the opportunity to experience it or last visited while on field trips in grade school. The museum is economically fit for our students as they are only required to provide a voluntary donation to gain entrance to the general exhibits. Vertebrate Evolution has been offered a total of ten semesters and is gaining attention from the students as an alternative to the more traditional Pathways courses. Students have consistently stated that the visit to the American Museum of Natural History was one of the best aspects of the course as they were able to observe the actual specimens that would only have been available from their lecture notes.


    Room E-258

    Presenter(s): Dr. Maria Entezari and Dr. Lucia Fuentes

    As educators, we strive to ensure our students acquire the tools to actively engage and participate in civic life based on informed and critical reflection of the environmental, social and political reality. As STEM educators, achieving this goal while ensuring students acquire the basic knowledge and skills set out in the course syllabi is challenging. Here we present an initiative whereby we were able to address problems of a) high attrition rates in first year biology, b) delivering required knowledge and skills and c) connecting the science to students’ reality. Educational assessments show that introducing authentic scientific research in the first-year science courses lowers attrition rates in STEM majors. A major difficulty in the implementation of this practice lies in integrating the research experiences into first-year courses. This limitation has resulted in the implementation of research projects restricted to one lab session or requiring students to work outside allocated course hours. Here we present our approach, including our objectives and pedagogical design strategy, of a semester-long research project which is fully integrated into the laboratory activities. We modified our existing laboratories to allow students to ask questions and collect information contributing to the final project, while learning concepts and skills outlined in traditional labs, in the context of scientific discovery. We also crafted assignments designed for students to build toward their final presentation, while promoting best practices for communicating scientific findings. As part of these assignments, students studied examples of communities that have been empowered by the scientific knowledge gained through proper inquiry. Finally, the labs incorporate research into the quality of water bodies close to the communities where students live, work and study connecting the science to their direct lived experiences and promoting an understanding of the social dimensions of scientific practice and insight into possibilities for civic engagement through science.


    Room E-260

    Presenter(s): Clara Chen, Esther Rosa, Midas Tsai, and James Wilson

    Field trips and experiential learning activities are often regarded as “days off” from learning, but this session will show how extracurricular pursuits and advisor involvement can be vital elements in enhancing and strengthening student learning and enriching academic performance. As research shows, experiential learning activities provide excellent means for building community, integrating learning objectives, and increasing disciplinary interest among students. Drawing on the outstanding academic and programmatic resources at LaGuardia, these activities can also cultivate cross-curricular education and professionalization opportunities. This presentation will highlight the ways in which members of the ASAP advisement team collaborated with faculty members from different departments to facilitate and support experiential learning activities.


    Room E-262

    Presenter(s): Salih Mansur

    In this presentation A student describes an experience with an internship program that engaged students in the critical evaluation of textbooks and Open Education Resources (OER). An ideal multimedia textbook format is described that includes etymology of scientific vocabulary, explanations with relatable examples, pictures/figures/tidbits that support the definitions/formulas, as well as the audio and video files that are supported online.


    Presenter(s): Christopher McHale, Ian McDermott, Steven Ovadia, Elizabeth Arestyl, Sukhrob Abdushukurov and Teqwona Roberts

    Despite the fact that they are the direct consumers, student opinions are rarely included in the development and selection of textbooks for college courses. This is especially alarming given that the cost of textbooks has risen over 800% in the last 30 years. Open educational resources (OER) provide an opportunity to decrease the expense of higher education by offering students and faculty a free and open option to replace the standard textbook. Although OER textbooks are growing in number, especially after a considerable investment in their development from the State of New York, students are still being excluded from the conversation about what features make a quality textbook.

    This presentation reports on a grant-funded project that strove to include student voices in evaluating textbooks with a focus on OER options. Students worked with library faculty as paid interns to evaluate sample chapters by completing a series of qualitative and quantitative surveys to generate feedback for OER improvements. The project has three goals. First, to create a toolkit for engaging students in critical thinking around education and open access. The second goal is to make all the project’s learning materials and processes available as an OER resource for use by other institutions and OER initiatives. Our final goal is to increase student awareness and empower them to advocate for OER options in higher education. The students involved worked as participants in the research and development of an evaluation method. They will also be participants in this presentation.


    Room E-264

    Presenter(s): Ian Alberts, Olga Calderon, Cristina Di Meo, Charles Keller, Praveenkumar Khethavath, Elaine Lendebol, Holly Porter-Morgan, and Ingrid Veras.

    The literature on building STEM success for underrepresented students is rich with studies of the positive effect of High Impact Practices (HIPs) to build complex thinking and prepare students to apply skills and knowledge in advanced education and career, as well as to increase persistence and graduation (Kuh, 2008). Examples of HIPs targeted to STEM majors at LaGuardia include undergraduate research and experiential learning. These activities, implemented by the Mathematics, Engineering, and Computer Science (MEC) and Natural Sciences (NS) departments, and supported by Title V grants, give students direct experience with issues they are studying in the curriculum and with ongoing efforts to analyze and solve problems in the community.

    LaGuardia has further enhanced these HIPs by incorporating digital badges, which are showcased on students’ ePortfolio. Digital badges motivate student engagement, deepen learning, and help connect learners to opportunities, resources, and one another. The “Experiential Learning Digital Badge” formally recognizes skills and core competencies students develop while participating in STEM undergraduate research or co-curricular activities that provide meaningful service to a STEM-focused organization or effort. Through these activities, students are also exposed to potential STEM-related career paths.

    In this session, you will learn about badging at LaGuardia, the specific activities MEC and NS faculty have integrated into the “Experiential Learning Digital Badge,” and explore opportunities to engage your students into these efforts and create your own.


    Room E-265

    Presenter(s): Dr. Nireata Seals, Luis Merchant

    Engagement with our students isn’t always easy. We live in a complex world where handling student behavior both in- and out-of-the-classroom can be challenging. This workshop will seek to: enhance the understanding of faculty and staff who encounter uncomfortable or awkward situations dealing with students, offer tips on how to manage your own behavior or actions when situations occur, and empower faculty to understand the processes and procedures for addressing student behaviors that pose challenges for in-classroom management.


    Room E-266

    Presenter(s): Michele De Goeas-Malone, Demetrios Kapetanakos, Thomas Dempsey, Pablo Avila, et al.

    Over the course of the last academic year, the Re-Thinking the Next Generation ePortfolio seminar has created a web resource available to all faculty to use when implementing ePortfolio-based assignments and curriculum. This contains resources to help faculty brainstorm, craft, design, and implement assignments putting into practice an effective ePortfolio pedagogy to advance student digital engagement and learning. Some of these resources include ePortfolio assignments from across the disciplines and faculty pitches to explain what ePortfolio is to new students. By attending this session, faculty will get and build a better understanding of the ePortfolio pedagogy and how to infuse it in course goals and objectives. More importantly, faculty will get a rationale for the Core ePortfolio and its integrative ability across the curriculum mapping course outcomes along the way. This, coupled with an exposure to the new ePortfolio interface, will equip faculty with the resources to adapt existing course learning outcomes to a digital tool that will engage students both inside and outside the classroom.


    Room E-266

    Presenter(s): Pablo Avila, R. Bhika, C. Chan, E. Hofmann

    Producing learning outcomes that help students move from theory to practice is fundamental to advancing their learning experience. Similarly, guiding faculty through the same process to move from the theoretical framework of the Guided Pathways to developing practical pedagogies is at the core of this proposal. Over the past year, faculty teams in more than 20 academic programs participated in the ePortfolio Mini-Grants Initiative that explored ePortfolio pedagogy coupled with disciplinary content, academic advisement, and co-curricular learning. Team projects explored a range of learning experiences from service to professional practices to inquiry-based, problem-based, and integrative learning assignments, representing meaningful opportunities for students to engage in reflective disciplinary activities both inside and outside the classroom. Students reflect on their experiences through the development of a Core ePortfolio—a single ePortfolio that students start building in their First Year Seminar course and that they carry along their academic journey at LaGuardia—supports each of the pillars in the “Guided Pathways” (Bailey, Jaggars & Jenkins 2015) framework that supports higher rates of persistence for community college students. Faculty from two departments (Health Sciences and Business & Technology) will then demonstrate how their programs are using the Core ePortfolio to support student learning in and out of the classroom, including clinical and internship experience, advisement, and co-curricular learning. The presentation will include sample student ePortfolios.





    Room E-225

    Presenter(s): Jason Hendrickson, Vanessa Bing, Renee Butler, Florence Kabba, Wendy Nicholson, Neetu Kaushik, Diane Gordon Conyers, Hugo Fernandez, Tuli Chatterji, Toni Foy, Student Volunteers

    This session continues the discussion of diversity and inclusion at LaGuardia, which was explored in Part I of the “From Diversity to Inclusion” workshop. Borrowing from the broader theme of Opening Sessions, how do we go from diversity in theory to inclusion in practice in the work that we do?

    This session draws upon student experiences with diversity and inclusion at LaGuardia. While LaGuardia boasts a student body with representation from all over the globe, it also faces the unique challenge of ensuring that each culture and ethnicity is respected and recognized at all facets of the institution, from student services to the classroom. Students will reflect upon what makes for a fruitful, meaningful, inclusive environment. Students will also share struggles and shortcomings in this regard, offering staff and faculty advice for handling the variety of issues inherent to such a racially and ethnically diverse institution.


    Room E-227

    Presenter(s): Tuli Chatterji, Nicolle Fernandes, Maria Entezari, John Chaney

    This presentation will offer inter-disciplinary theoretical and pedagogical perspectives facilitating discussions on global learning and undergraduate research at LaGuardia. In his essay “Disjuncture and Difference,” theorist Arjun Appadurai states that the new “global cultural economy has to be seen as a complex, overlapping, disjunctive order that cannot be understood in terms of existing center-periphery model.” LaGuardia’s Global Learning rubric’s dimensions—Understanding Global Issues and Events, Communicating Knowledge in Global Contexts, and Ethical Engagement and Global Self-Awareness—rightfully captures Appadurai’s claims for the need to transcend the dichotomy between center and periphery in today’s world. While a multicultural focused-pedagogy where a critical analysis of global texts or issues allow students to engage in pluralistic narratives and ideologies, the outcomes do not necessarily forge global learning. On many instances, to echo the concern of Carol Geary Schneider (2015), “‘global’ is more invoked than ensured” (AAC&U 2017) thereby resulting in the failure of students to internalize and successfully demonstrate their understanding of the three dimensions of the Global Learning rubric.

    While languages, cultures, food, and resources are visible factors reinforcing conversations between multiple centers and peripheries, global citizenship is not only how human being and their respective communities interconnect, but also how issues such as human rights, poverty, trade, environmental sustainability intersect. Presenters will therefore share frameworks that will offer diverse and interdisciplinary approaches to help students become proactive, global-minded citizens. They will also attempt in defining what “global learning” means in each of the disciplines and for LaGuardia community in general.


    Room E-229

    Presenter(s): Leslie G. Scamacca

    Today’s traveler is looking for a genuine experience while they explore new communities. Volunteer Tourism, or “Voluntourism” is a special interest tourism niche that fulfills the traveler’s need for authenticity while making a positive impact on the tourism community.

    Voluntourism is not limited to tourism industries. LaGuardia students should be encouraged to engage with their local and global communities and connect these experiences with classroom learning. This presentation will discuss the niche of voluntourism and translate industry best practices into classroom experiential learning. We will discuss volunteer opportunities locally and globally, how to encourage students to participate, and how to craft assignments and gauge learning through volunteering.


    Room E-229

    Presenter(s): Rosemary Talmadge & Nichole Shippen

    During these challenging times, when many in higher education are lamenting the state of our democracy, we are preparing to launch a new civic engagement initiative at LaGuardia. Our first steps will be a more robust “Voter Registration Drive” and “Get Out the Vote Initiative” in the Fall. But voting is only a part of civic engagement and many of our students cannot vote. We plan to follow these Fall initiatives with a broader effort that explores what civic engagement and democracy mean to students, faculty and staff on a diverse and international campus - and how we can best support these in our classrooms and co-curricular programming.

    Join us for this interactive session, in which we will consider how we can help our students better understand the importance of being “critical thinkers and socially responsible citizens” in a “greater community of which our college is just a part.” We’ll be question brainstorming and mind-mapping ideas for the year ahead. We also hope to meet some kindred spirits who might be interested advising and collaborating with us as we design and implement this new civic engagement initiative.


    Room E-234

    Presenter(s): Leigh Garrison-Fletcher, Bede McCormack, and students

    This presentation will introduce the audience to a Global Learning assignment developed and implemented as part of a CTL mini-grant for ELL101 (Introduction to Language). The presenters will describe how the assignment asks students to connect their understanding of linguistic theory to their lived language experiences by reflecting on what attitudes exist about a language or dialect they know and use, whether it is perceived as a prestige or stigmatized language/dialect depending on context, and what social factors contribute to those attitudes. As a means of pushing students to recognize how issues local to them are also experienced globally, students are also asked to research a language/dialect they are not familiar with and address the same issues of perception, context, and bias.

    The presenters will also describe the various phases of development of the assignment including recognizing the need for such an assignment, CTL feedback and support, the creation of an assignment ePortfolio, and the program-wide implementation of the assignment.

    In order to fully present the assignment, the presentation will include written excerpts from students’ work and two students who have taken the course will join the faculty presenters and share their personal experiences of completing the assignment.


    Room E-258

    Presenter(s): Tao Chen, Glenn Henshaw, Choon Shan Lai, Soloman Kone

    Having opportunities to connect different disciplines will enable students to become better problem-solvers and critical thinkers. Last academic year, mathematics and economics faculty work together to make connection between these two disciplines by contextualizing college algebra with economics and embedding more mathematics backgrounds to economics courses. In this talk, we will discuss the practice and findings about this collaboration, in particular, if math and economics help each other.


    Room E-260

    Presenter(s): Garrett Neergaard, Matthew Joffe, Frank LaTerra-Bellino

    In an attempt to explore different and impactful ways of teaching LaGuardia faculty and staff tools for addressing crisis in the classroom, Frank LaTerra-Bellino, Director of the Wellness Center, and Matthew Joffe, Director of Outreach and Education for the Wellness Center, collaborated with Professor Garrett Neergaard in the Theatre Program to create a student-driven training video. The workshop in which the film is used is called, “How to Identify and Support Students in Distress”.

    Participating in the creation of the film presented LaGuardia theatre students with a unique opportunity. In a simulation of a professional film set, students were given the chance to experience professional set-protocol and etiquette, acting on-camera technique and ensemble-building. More importantly, it enabled them to draw on classroom learning in the service of deepening understanding among faculty and staff in relating to students in need.

    In this presentation we will discuss the process by which the film developed from idea, to writing, to filming, to final edit. They will discuss how the film is used as part of the workshop, “How to Identify and Support Students in Distress” and the response the team has received as a result of adding the film to their workshop. The team of presenters will conclude by playing a selection of scenes from the film.


    Room E-262

    Presenter(s): Renee Freeman-Butler, Jose Plasencia, Maria Ribas, Donniece Davis-Cooper, Luis Restrepo, Jian Fang, Venice Hughes

    Increasingly transfer students are making up larger percentages of students entering higher education institutions. Transfer students represented 37% (n=1669) of LaGuardia’s Fall 2017 new student headcount. Conversely, 1543 LaGuardia students sought to transfer to 4-year institutions during the same period. As a college community, embracing their prior college experience, offering pointed opportunities for engagement, and awareness of the issues affecting their transition in, as well as providing guidance as they transition out, facilitates the transition process, encourages persistence, and student success.


    Room E-264

    Presenter(s): Ramon De Los Santos, Jessica Perez, Karen Gonzalez

    How do we help students for life post-graduation? Work force readiness skills (soft skills) are in short supply in today’s job market. Employers surveyed by the National Association for Colleges and Employers (NACE) expressed a need for students with critical thinking/problem solving skills, professional and work ethics, strong oral/written communication skills, and team work/collaboration skills. We will share how CCPD and ASAP prepare students, in the Career Readiness Digital Badging Program and through the completion of ASAP Career Benchmarks, to articulate their skills to employers with digital badges using NACE’s Career Readiness Competencies and connecting our students’ academic, co-curricular activities and experiential learning to build a professional presence and portfolio. Learn about the various badging tracks and collaborations between both departments designed for students to complete specific activities related to NACE’s Career Readiness Competencies and how digital badging incentivizes work force readiness skills for students and employers. The presentation will serve as a guide to embedding career readiness and professional activities to support classroom learning.


    Room E-265

    Presenter(s): Jennifer Arroyo, Jacqueline Brashears, Catherine Colangelo, Milena Cuellar, Maureen Drennan, Cory Feldman, Kahdeidra Martin, Dionne Miller, and Michele Piso Manoukian

    Across the academy are “boundary spanners”, faculty who narrow the theory/practice gap by bringing into the classroom evidence-based professional knowledge that supplements or transcends the textbook. Accountants, engineers, fine artists, performers, physical therapists, or veterinarians, these colleagues rely on real-world clinical, studio, boardroom, or industrial practices to enhance student learning. Yet while the practitioner-educator’s dual identity expands the classroom to include professional experiences relevant to diverse communities and careers, she may experience herself as marginal, an outsider in the “insider” world of academics as traditionally defined.

    Evolving from the 2017-2018 Practitioner to Academic CTL seminar, this panel’s discussion topics include the shifting definitions of the identity and role of the “academic” in the two-year college. We explore the practitioner-academic gap and discuss ways in which practitioners and academics are alike and unalike and argue for greater institutional recognition of the productive tension in the practitioner-as-academic identity. Equally important, participants will identify the ways that boundary spanners translate their professional experiences into the disciplinary knowledge and supporting information for required classroom material. Format: Small group discussions will follow brief introductory remarks.


    Room E-266

    Presenter(s): Lara Beaty and Students

    The Student Experiences Research Group (SERG) is composed of students who engage in discussion, exploration, and formal research of student experiences to understand and promote learning and development. It has completed seven years of exploration of student experiences and the design, data collection and partial analysis of four formal research studies. Students have participated as volunteers, for course credit, and through Federal Work Study. During this presentation, the faculty mentor, students, and alum will discuss the complex and evolving work of the group that nurtures collaboration, social support, academic skills, and experience in psychological research. The day-to-day experiences of students are connected to theory and research in discussions, using a model of activity systems to connect psychological concepts to experiences and a systemic view of college. SERG mixes traditional undergraduate research approaches with ideas from participatory action research and Engestrom’s change lab. The collaborative process is both challenging and stimulating.